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Minutes of the 24 October 2004 Meeting

[Note: These submissions appear on the Apr 05 LoAR]

Notes and Announcements

Meeting commenced at 10:30AM.

In attendance were: Jeanne Marie Crescent, Lachlan Dolphin, Thomas Brownwell, Islyle Hemitite, Cormac Bellows, Honour Popinjay, Kean Trident, Eirikr Gold Phoenix, Santine Gold Forest, Caelfind ingen hui Ruaircc, Aldith MacPharlane, Garrett Shane Payne, Gwennyth of the Red Gryphon, Perrin le Blanc, Damien Sable Fret, Catherine de Winter, Grimr inn harfagri, Su Battlement, Bruce Oak Leaf, Damashi Blue Mountain, Selene Aurum, Jared Alexandre Blaydeau, and Christopher Golden Rose.

The next heraldry meetings will be: November 21st and December 19th. Note that the December meeting has been rescheduled to avoid conflict with QC Archery on December 12th.

The tentative schedule for 2005: January 23rd, February 27th, March 20th, (April Crown name/armory submissions due), April 24th, May 15th, June 12th or 19th (whichever on is not QC Equestrian, which is not yet on the kingdom calendar), July 10th, August 7th, September 11th (I know this is against Agincourt Archery but a free Sunday in Sept. is impossible, to find; Sept. Crown name/armory submissions due), October 2nd, November 6th, and December 4th. These are all subject to change; keep an eye on the Caid webpage.

Crescent apologized for the chaos caused by her recent private life; she reminds the College that Lachlan Dolphin is her drop-dead deputy (and will be running the November meeting). If Crescent is called away from an event, Dolphin will keep the trains running. Please lend him your cooperation.

Coronation is approaching; if your group has a presentation, contact Crescent at least a week in advance. Let her know if your group is willing to present at QC, rather than at Coronation (just in case time runs short). The same applies to Twelfth Night; things run must smoother if Crescent knows well in advance. (Note that presentations are usually scheduled in the order received! This is called "incentive.")

Crescent notes: Quarterly reports are now due. Information for warranting is due no later than November 7th (SCA name, legal name, contact information, membership number and expiration date, and territory/title/rank). I'd like all heralds (territorial and at-large) to be warranted. If I don't get this information your warrant will not be renewed. As a reminder, baronies must have a warranted herald.

Items marked with an * were submitted at Great Western War. Thanks to Cormac, who was in charge of the consulting table, and all those who spent time at the table.

Approved submissions will be forwarded to Laurel on the December 18, 2004 Letter of Intent.


Altavia, Barony of

*Cíareach inghean Mhathghamhna of Tuaim Gréine - New Name

[Name] Submitted as Cíareach inghean Mathgamain of Tuaim Gréine. The submitter is interested in a feminine name. She allows all changes and if the name must be changed she cares most about the language/culture (which the forms don't specify, but we assume is Irish).

Cíareach is found in OCM (s.n. Caírech, p.44) as the more recent form of a saint's name.

inghean is Gaelic, "daughter of"

The patronymic was given as Mathgamain, found in OCM (s.n. Mathgamain, p.135) and dated to 1019. This is the nominative form. The genitive form is found in Woulfe's Irish Names and Surnames, p.391, which gives mac Ma{t.}{g.}a{m.}na (mac Mathghamhna) as the Gaelic patronym anglicized as MacMahon. Following inghean, the name would lenite to Mhathghamhna.

Tuaim Gréine is found in Room's Dictionary of Irish Place-names (q.v. Tomgraney, p. 121). Room states "County Clare, Tuaim Gre(')ine 'burial mound of Grainne'. "In ancient legend, Grainne was the daughter of Cormac mac Airt who, after a number of amatory adventures, was drowned in Lough Graney and subsequently, when her body had been found in the River Graney, was buried at Tomgraney." Her name means "(Irish grian)"

Name approved as changed and forwarded to Laurel.


Angels, Barony of

*Æthelwynn of Llanddowror - New Name

[Name] The submitter is interested a feminine name. She marked the box requesting changes to make the name authentic, but then changed her mind. She will accept minor but not major changes, and if the name must be changed she cares most about the sound.

Æthelwynn is dated to 940 on p. 61 of Searle's Onomasticon Anglo-Saxonicum.

of is a locative preposition.

Llanddowror is found in Dewi Davies' Welsh Place Name and Their Meaning, p. 26. We checked the weirdness table for Anglo-Saxon vs. Welsh, and neither combination was on the list. We note that Anglo-Saxon and Gaelic are considered a weirdness, so we believe this combination will also fall under that category.

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Angels, Barony of the - New Badge:

Gules, a seraph's head proper, haloed and winged Or

[Name] Barony of the Angels was registered "at some point". The badge is to be associated Order of the Seraphic Star, registered 04/81.

[Armory] This may conflict with the badge of the Giuseppe Franceso da Borgia, submitted at this same meeting: Per saltire gules and sable, a cherub Or. There's a CD for the field. We hold there is a CD between seraph and cherub; the number of wings should be worth difference, just as there's a difference between a mullet of five points and a mullet of eight points. If these are deemed to conflict, we note that Giuseppe's badge was submitted first, and takes precedence. Thankfully, Giuseppe quickly provided a letter permitting this conflict if such exists.

The emblazon on this form is smaller than the required 4 ½" diameter due to use of online forms printed with "Shrink to fit" turned ON. As this is a newly-discovered difficulty, we will not return this badge for this reason. The form will be redrawn prior to being sent to Laurel.

Badge approved and forwarded to Laurel.


*Caterina di Cellini - New Name and New Device:

Per chevron vert and argent, two trees eradicated Or and a fox passant to sinister azure

[Name] The submitter is interested in a 16th century Italian feminine name, though she does not request changes to make the name authentic. She will accept minor but not major changes, and if the name must be changed she cares most about the language/culture. She will not allow the formation of a holding name.

Caterina is found in De Felice Nomi (header, p. 102), dated to 1380 when the patron saint of Sienna died.

Cellini is found in De Felice Cognomi (s.n. Celli, p. 100), undated. Commonly used in Tuscany.

[Armory] This form appears to have been photo reduced some time prior to submission. The emblazon is not so small as to be returnable for this reason.

Name and device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


*Griffin ap Gryffydd - New Name

[Name] The submitter wants a masculine name. He will accept minor but not major changes, and if the name must be changed he cares most about the language/culture (which is not specified, but we assume Welsh).

Griffin is a given name found in Morgan & Morgan (s.n. Gruffudd, pp.102-105). Griffin ap Yerward is cited in 1295.

ap is the Welsh patronymic marker ("son of")

Gryffydd is found in Morgan & Morgan (s.n. Gruffudd, p. 102), where it notes "not uncommon in early documents". Blethin ap Gryffyd is cited in 1292. Note that Griffin and Gryffydd are variant spellings of the same name, which is also found as Griffith. We're not sure that both variations would be in the same name, but the following conflict makes the point moot.

This conflicts with Griffith ap Griffith ap Griffith, registered Feb 82. The submitted name claims a relationship, which isn't permitted without permission. Compare for example: "This name ... claims relationship with Griffith ap Morgan ap Griffith, registered in June 1992". [Morgan ap Grufydd, 06/01, R-Ealdormere].

Name returned for presumption.


Calafia, Barony of

*Ávangr Ragnarsson - New Name and New Device:

Per bend Or and azure, a bend argent between a popinjay and a knorr counterchanged.

[Name] Submitted as Ævangr Ragnarsson. The submitter will accept minor but not major changes.

Ævangr is the submitter's preferred spelling but we were unable to find it in any of our reference books. Ávangr was provided by the submitter as an alternate, and is a masculine given name found in Geirr Bassi on p. 8. We are forwarding the alternate documentable documented form.

Ragnarsson is a patronymic formed from Ragnarr, which is found as a masculine given name on p. 14 of Geirr Bassi, in accordance with the rules found on p. 17 of Geirr Bassi.

Name approved as changed and forwarded to Laurel. Device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Avenel Kellough - New Household Name (Company of the Golden Gargoyle) and New Badge:

Sable, a horned demon's head erased Or.

[Name] The submitter's primary name was registered in 02/86. The submitter will accept all changes and cares most about the meaning. No documentation was included.

Golden is dated to the 13th C in this spelling in the Compact OED, p. 1171.

Gargoyle is dated to the 15th C in the Compact OED, p. 1116.

Golden Gargoyle is a possible inn sign, thus House of the Golden Gargoyle would follow the example in RfS III.2.b. We are unsure if Company of the Golden Gargoyle is a valid formation, but as House of the Golden Gargoyle should be registerable we are forwarding this with a request for help in determining if Company of the Golden Gargoyle is registerable.

[Armory] The badge is to be associated with the household. Unfortunately, it conflicts with the arms Azure, a horned demon's head erased Or, Talanque, 08/78. Also, the form appears to have been photo reduced at some point prior to submission and could be returned for this reason as well. When resubmitting, the submitter should be careful to use a full-sized form. If the form is printed from the Internet, please remember to turn off the "shrink to fit" option.

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel. Badge returned for conflict.


*Caoimhinn ingen an Chleirigh - New Name

[Name] Submitted as Caoimhinn ingen Cleirigh. The submitter marked no boxes. She would prefer Caoimhinn nic an Cleirigh.

Caoimhinn is found in OCM (s.n. Cáemfind, p. 41) as "the name of the daughter of Conall Echluath, legendary ancestor of the O Briens and related families." No dates are given. We have no evidence of the name's use by a real, historical figure, but Caoimhín was the name of a male Irish saint, and was registered as recently as Dec 2002.

ingen is "daughter of"; this is the pre-1200 spelling. To match the periods of the rest of the names, this should probably be inghean.

Cleirigh is found in MacLysaght (s.n. Clery, p. 46) where it is dated to c. 1200. Woulfe's Irish Names and Surnames, p.311, cites Mac an {C.}l{e'}iri{g.} with Elizabethan anglicizations.

We have several problems here. If we use the documentable (masculine) name, the byname can no longer use ingen/inghean. Caoimhín mac an Chléirigh would be acceptable, but not feminine. If she wants a feminine name, inghean an Chléirigh would be the appropriate byname, but we'd need a documented feminine given name. We note that the submitter is a member of Clan Cleary in Calafia, in which case she might prefer inghean ua Chléirigh, the daughter of an O'Cleary.

Name returned for lack of documentation and consultation.


*Conall Synclare - New Name and New Device:

Argent, on a chevron between three roses azure, three swallows volant contourny argent.

[Name] The submitter is interested in a masculine name. He allows all changes, and if the name must be changed he cares most about the language/culture (unspecified).

Conall is found in OCM (s.n. Conall, p. 56). There are two saints of the name mentioned in the text. No dates are provided in the text.

Synclare is found in Black (s.n. Sinclair, p. 728), where it is dated to 1482. We note that the combination of Gaelic / Scots is a weirdness, q.v. Elspeth O'Shea, 02/00.

[Armory] This form appears to have been photo reduced some time prior to submission. The emblazon is not so small as to be returnable for this reason.

Name and device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


*Draco de Monte Cassino - New Name and New Device:

Vert, a dragon passant contourny Or maintaining four grenades proper, in chief two towers argent and a trimount Or.

[Name] The submitter is interested in a masculine name. He will accept minor but not major changes, and if the name must be changes he cares most about the meaning "Dragon of the Mountain Castle". He originally marked the box disallowing minor changes, but he changed his mind at the consult table.

Draco is found in Morlet "Les Noms de Personne dur le Territoire de l'Ancienne Gaule du VIe au XIIe Siècle", volume I, (s.n. DRAG-, p. 74). It is documented from "Cartulaire de Saint Vincent de Mácon", and appears to be dated to 1060.

de is a locative marker. We are unsure if the correct form is de Monte Cassino or del Monte Cassino, so we are sending it forward as submitted.

Monte Cassino is dated to the late 11th century in The Norman Kingdom of Sicily by Donald Matthew (Cambridge University Press, 1992) on p. 19. The text cites the author Amatus of Monte Cassino.

Name and device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Duibheasa inghean Fhionnghaile - New Name.

[Name] Submitted as Duibheasa Mag Fhionnghaile. The submitter is interested in a feminine name. She will accept minor but not major changes, and if the name must be changed she cares most about the sound. If for some reason the element Mag needs to be changed, the submitter allows it.

Duibheasa is in OCM p.78, under Dub Essa. It is the third spelling in the header, the second after the colon. "It was a relatively common name in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries."

Mag Fhionnghaile is in MacLysaght p.126 under Mac Ginley. It is the form in italics after the header. It is undated.

The correct patronymic formation in Gaelic would be Duibheasa inghean Fhionnghaile. We are making this change, as permitted by the submitter.

Name approved as changed and forwarded to Laurel.


Elizabeth Dunbar - New Name and Device:

Gules, a gryphon and a bordure argent charged with roses proper.

[Name] The submitter is interested in a feminine name. She will accept minor but not major changes.

Elizabeth is listed in Black, p. 773 (s.n. Tod), with Elizabeth Tode dated 1467, and on p. 711 (s.n. Scapa), with Elizabeth Scalpa dated 1571.

Dunbar is also in Black, p.227, as the header spelling. In addition to many other citations, James Dunbar (no of or de) is dated to 1425. This is a great Scots name.

[Armory] The roses are "heraldically proper", i.e. gules, barbed vert, seeded Or. This is close to Rufus Tenstone (03/86): Gules, a griffin couchant to sinister, wings elevated and addorsed argent, within a bordure argent semy of torteaux. Technically these are clear, with a CD for the posture of the griffin and a CD for type of tertiaries. The submitter should be aware that there is a possibility this will be returned for visual conflict per RfS X.5.

This form appears to have been photo reduced some time prior to submission. The emblazon is not so small as to be returnable for this reason.

Name and device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


*Erdenitei Badma Delgere - New Name and Device.

Or, a "demon's head" (kirtimukha) cabossed within an annulet of dragon's scales conjoined vert.

[Name] The submitter is interested in a 12th century Mongolian name, though he did not mark the box to make the name authentic. The name on the submission form is a mixture of upper and lower case thus we have chosen to use the capitalization used in a typed note accompanying the submission.

The name elements are taken Mongolian-English Dictionary (Haltod, M, Hangin, J, Kassatkin, S, and Lessing, F, University of California Press, 1960); page numbers are not included in the photocopies. Erdenitei means "precious, valuable". Badma means "lotus, water lily". Delgere means "to unfold, grow, increase, expand, spread, become extensive; to develop; to bloom, blossom". The submitter includes contact information for Sue Dross, Secretary of the Mongolian Society and states that "she inquired with Dr. Chris Atwood professor of Mongolian Linguistics and Board member of the Mongolian Society regarding my proposed Mongolian name 'Erdenitei Badma Delgere' translated in English as 'Precious Lotus Blossom'. Dr. Atwood agrees that this name is appropriate Mongol name for the SCA timeline." However, this does not constitute sufficient documentation for the name, either in the choice of elements or its construction here.

The submitter also includes a copy of "On the Documentation and Construction of Period Mongolian Names" by Baras-aghus Naran, (sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/mongol.html) which does not directly support the submitted name. While Mongolian names seem to have been descriptive, and included animal names (lion, bear, falcon) and words with beneficial meaning (eternal, long life, loyalty), those elements don't seem to have been combined in this manner. Moreover, three-element Mongolian names do not seem to fit the pattern documented in this article.

[Armory] The central charge is documented from Robert Beer's Encyclopedia of Tibetan Symbols and Motifs (Shambhala Publications, 1999), page number not included in the photocopy, where it's called a "kirtimukha" (but no illustration provided). However, as this would be the defining instance of this charge in the SCA, we need solid documentation: that this was its period form, that it was known to period Europeans, that it is sufficiently different from other charges to allow ready identification across the tourney field.

Name and device returned for lack of documentation.


*Gaius Brutus Gracchus - New Name and New Device:

Sable, on a bend sinister between two bulldogs statant respectant argent, four quatefoils vert.

[Name] The submitter is interested in a masculine name appropriate for 110 AD Rome, though he does not check the box requesting changes to make the name authentic. We have changed the date of birth on the name form to match that on the device form - the submitter is definitely over 1 month old. No documentation was provided for the name.

Gaius is found in Withycombe (header, p. 124), where the author states it is a Roman praenom. We found Gaius Sempronius Gracchus in Webster's Biographical Dictionary, p. 617.

Brutus is found in Lempriére (header, p. 111). There are several Romans of this name.

Gracchus is found in Lempriére (header, p. 257) with citations for T. Sempronius Gracchus father of Tiberius Gracchus (a tribune in 133 B.C.) and Caius Gracchus (d. 121 B.C.) and others.

[Armory] According to the article "May I Use a Collie In My Arms" by Ammalyne Starchild Haraldsdottir (KWHS Proceedings, Meridies, Oct 82, p.49), the Bulldog is "definitely" period, dating from England in the 13th C.

A majority of heralds in the meeting expressed difficulty identifying the bulldogs. Some guessed they were bears. Also, the bulldogs stand in a posture that is not heraldic, especially the lower one. This must be returned for these problems.

This form appears to have been photo reduced some time prior to submission. The emblazon is not so small as to be returnable for this reason alone, but the submitter is asked to use a standard form when they resubmit.

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel. Device returned for redraw.


*Gemma Rosalia - New Name and New Device:

Purpure, three increscents in bend between two ferrets statant argent.

[Name] Submitted as Gemma Rosalía. The submitter is interested in a feminine name. She will allow all changes, and if the name must be changed she cares most about the sound.

Gemma is a given name found in De Felice, Nomi, p.182. If we may trust our Italian, the name is spread through the Center and North of Italy and rare in the South, and is derived from the last Emperor Gemma or Gemmula.

Rosalia is a byname found in De Felice, Cognomi, p.216. Again, if we may trust our Italian, the byname is a Sicilian cognomen derived from the cult of St. Rosalia. Submitted as Rosalía with an accent, we note that the accent marks in De Felice are for pronunciation guidance only. We are therefore dropping the accent.

[Armory] The ferrets are unrecognizable as drawn. Laurel has previously returned ferrets, otters, ermines, and other weaseloid creatures when not drawn correctly, so we must do so as well. The tail needs to be more slender, and the hind foot less clubbed. The primary charges should be drawn larger as well. No conflicts were found.

Name approved as changed and forwarded to Laurel. Device returned for redraw.


Grim øxarbrjótr Thorsten - New Name and Device:

Sable, an axe bendwise sinister and in base a serpent erect tail nowed Or.

[Name] The submitter is interested in a masculine name. He will accept minor but not major changes, and if the name must be changed he cares most about the meaning of the name (axe-breaker).

Grimr is in Geirr Bassi, p.10. The submitter prefers not to have the "r".

øxarbrjótr - "axe-breaker".. Geirr Bassi cites garđabrjótr "fence breaker" (p.21), haugabrjótr "cairn breaker" (p.22) and hornabrjótr "horn breaker" (p.23), showing -brjótr to be a valid deuterotheme. Geirr Bassi cites øxarstafr "ax-stave, ax-handle" (p.30), showing øxar- as a valid prototheme.

Thorsten - the submitter says this element is a surname meaning "brood of Thor." Bahlow/Gentry (s.n. Thorsen, p. 506) gives Thorsten as a byname derived from the old Norse Thor-steinn "Thor's hammer". No date is given for this spelling. We strongly suspect this is not a valid construction: if Thorsten is a surname, it's far too late for the period of the first two elements; if Thorsten is an Old Norse byname, it lacks documentation. We're uncertain whether Grim without the R would be valid for the earlier period, although it would be for later anglicizations.

[Armory] This design appears reasonable, but must be returned for lack of a name. This form appears to have been photo reduced some time prior to submission. The emblazon is not so small as to be returnable for this reason alone, but the submitter is asked to use a standard form when they resubmit.

Name returned for lack of documentation of its construction and elements. Device returned for lack of name.


*Isabella dei Altavilla - New Name

[Name] The submitter is interested in a feminine name. She will accept minor but not major changes, and if the name must be changed she cares most about the language/culture (Italian). Submitted as Isabella di Altavilla.

Isabella is found in De Felice Nomi (s.n. Isabèlla, p. 215), and is cited as a character in Boccaccio's Decameron (1313-1375).

dei is the standard form of indicating family membership (e.g. dei Medici).

Altavilla is found in The Norman Kingdom of Sicily by Donald Matthew (Cambridge University Press, 1992) on p. 141 where it states "The largest and most powerful of the Norman families was the Altavilla, to which Roger II himself belonged." We have also found it in De Felice Cognomi (header, p. 52), where the name is widely spread across the south of the peninsula and Sicily. Webster's Biographical Dictionary dates Roger II to 1095-1154.

Name approved as changed and forwarded to Laurel.


*Jutta Maltussdóttir - New Name

[Name] The submitter will accept minor but not major changes.

Jutta is a feminine given name found in Geirr Bassi, p. 12.

Maltussdóttir is a patronymic formed from Maltus, which is found on p. 13 of Geirr Bassi, , in accordance with the rules found on p. 17 of Geirr Bassi.

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


*Tancrède Larcade - New Name

[Name] The submitter is interested in a masculine name. He allows minor but not major changes, and if the name must be changed he cares most about the sound.

Tancrède is found in Dauzat, p. 562. "anc. n,. de bapt. d'orgine germ., n. normand (XIeS.); quelques patronymes (Tancrad- : thanc-, pens{e'}e; rad-m conseil)." It seems to be dated here to the eleventh century.

Larcade is found in Dauzat, p. 367. " désignait une maison à arcade ou située près d'une arcade." Apparently a locative, a house located upon an arcade.

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Wilhelm Grimm - Kingdom Name Appeal and Kingdom Resub Device

Gules, a sheaf of three lightning bolts Or surmounted by a boar statant argent, in base the Roman number XXIII Or.

[Name] The submitter allows all changes, and if the name must be changed he cares most about the sound. His first submission, Wilhelm Grimm, was returned at Kingdom in Sept 98 and again in Nov 03 for conflict with one of the Brothers Grimm. His next submission, Wilhelm Skalla Grimm, was returned at Kingdom in April 04 for lack of documentation. He is now appealing the first returns, claiming that Wilhelm Grimm (1786-1859) is not important enough to protect.

In support of the appeal, some members of the College noted that neither of the Brothers Grimm is famous as an individual -- it's the Brothers Grimm, not Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm that are known to the world. Even the entry in Webster's Biographical Dictionary, p.632, is for both brothers together, not as individuals. Others of the College maintain that Wilhelm Grimm is, of his own fame, important enough to protect; the fact that he had a brother, with whom he worked in collecting folktales, does not detract from his own fame. A poll taken of the College showed that a majority did not support the appeal; it is forwarded to Laurel without the support of the Caidan College of Heralds.

[Armory] His previous device, Gules, three lightning bolts in pile conjoined in base to the Roman numerals XXIII Or, overall a boar statant to sinister argent (our best guess at the original blazon) was returned at Kingdom 09/98 for a redraw. His resubmitted device keeps getting returned for lack of name. Now that we're forwarding the name, we can forward the device as well.

This form appears to have been photo reduced some time prior to submission. The emblazon is not so small as to be returnable for this reason alone, though it is very close to the minimum size.

Name appeal forwarded to Laurel without support of Caidan College. Device approved and forward to Laurel.


Tanwayour, Canton of (Calafia)

*Vígúlfr inn norr{oe}ni - New Name

[Name] The submitter is interested in a masculine name authentic for 10th century Norse. He allows all changes, and if the name must be change he cares most about the language/culture.

Vígúlfr is listed as an fvn ("old west Norse") in "Nordiskt Runnamnslexikon -- Dictionary of names from Old Norse Runic Inscriptions" by Lena Peterson (http://www.nordiska.uu.se/forskn/samnord.htm).

inn norr{oe}ni is found Aryanhwy's "Viking Bynames found in the Landnámabók" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/vikbynames.html) as meaning "the Norwegian".

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Carreg Wen, Shire of

*Issobell nic Gilbert - New Name and New Device:

Argent, in pale a chevron inverted gules charged with three roses Or and a tree eradicated proper.

[Name] The submitter will allow no changes, and if the name must be changed she cares most about the language/culture ("15th century Scots -- Gilbert is most important"). The submitter will not allow the creation of a holding name. Submitted as Iosobail ni Gilbert After telephone consultation with the submitter, she's agreed to the modified form, Issobell nic Gilbert.

Originally submitted as Iosobail, which is found in Arval Benicouer's "Some Scottish Gaelic Feminine Names". The url notes that this article has been pulled due to errors, and superceded by Effrick's "Scottish Gaelic Given Names", which does not include Iosobail. We note the precedent from François's tenure: "Submitted as Iosobail de Lockford, the submitter requested a name authentic for the 15th C. The Gaelic form Iosobail and the Scots form de Lockford would not have been mixed in period. As such, we have changed the given name to a Scots form to comply with the submitter's request. [Issobell de Lockford, 09/01, A-Atenveldt]."

ni is claimed to be the late period Scots meaning "daughter of". According to precedent (LoAR cover letter, April 2000), ni is post-period; nyn or neyn would be period Scots forms, or nic or nyk "daughter of the son of" would be acceptable.

Gilbert is found in "Late 15th Century Given Names from the Orkney Islands" (author unknown), but we were given neither url nor photocopy. Gilbert is also in Black, p.298, with a Gilbert McGloid in 1541. The use of Gilbert with McGloid demonstrates Scots usage for the given name, allowing it to be combined with nic; and in any case, combining Scots and English is no longer a weirdness (q.v. Michael Duncan of Hadley, A-Caid, 04/04).

We note the registered name of Isobel FitzGilbert (reg. March 2000). Technically, according to precedent from Francois' tenure, the two are clear since one denotes a son (in origin) and the other a daughter.

[Armory] The chevron and tree are co-primaries, hence the convoluted blazon. We note there are period examples of a fess between two chevrons, showing that chevrons can be shoved to chief to accommodate other charges.

Name approved as changed and forwarded to Laurel. Device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Darach, Shire of

*Blaunche of Warwick - New Name

[Name] The submitter is interested in a feminine name authentic for 16th century England. She will accept minor but not major changes. Submitted as Bianca of Warwick, she specifically allows Blaunche as an alternative to Bianca.

Bianca is found in Withycome (s.n. Blanche, pp. 50-51) which lists it as an Italian given name which "is occasionally used in England", which implies modern usage. Since the submitter specifically requested a name authentic for England, we are forwarding the documentably English alternate that the submitter listed.

Blaunche is found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Feminine Given Names in Registers of Church of St. Mary's Dymock" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/dymock/dym_women.html), where it is dated 1551/2.

Warwick is found in R&W (s.n. Warwick, p. 477), dated from 1086.

Name approved as changed and forwarded to Laurel.


*Miriel MacEvilly of Sligo - New Name

[Name] The submitter is interested in a feminine name. She will accept minor but not major changes, and if the name must be changed she cares most about the language/culture (unspecified).

Miriel is found in Withycombe (s.n. Muriel, p. 224), where it is dated to the 12th and 13th centuries.

MacEvilly is found as a header in MacLysaght, p. 101, undated. The name is "An Irish patronymic assumed by the Stuantons of Mayo." It is also found as the Anglicized form of Mac an Mhíleadha (Woulfe, p. 315); "son of the knight", undated. The surname is from Woulfe, "Irish Names and Surnames", p. 315, with various spellings including M'Aveely, M'Evilee, M'Evelly and M'Ivile. These are in italics, which signifies that they are circa Elisabeth or James I.

Sligo is found as a header in Room's Dictionary of Irish Placenames, p. 114; it is undated.

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Dreiburgen, Barony of

*Bronach ingen Eogan - New Name and New Device:

Pean, in bend a decrescent and a swan naiant argent

[Name] The submitter is interested in a feminine name authentic 9th-12th century Irish. She accepts all changes, and if the name must be changed she cares most about the language/culture. Prior to submission, the submitter changed the name from all caps to the properly capitalized form.

Bronach is found in OCM (header, p. 38). Noted as "a rare early name". It is both a masculine and a feminine name.

ingen is pre-1200 Gaelic "daughter of".

Eogan is found as a masculine given name in OCM (s.n. Eógan, p. 87). We note that the use of accents in Gaelic is optional, as long as the usage is consistent throughout the entire name. The authors state, "Eógan is one of the twenty most popular names in early Ireland."

[Armory] This device is clear of Pean, in bend a decrescent and a peacock close contourny pavonated to base argent (Errica de Creau, August 85). There is a change of type and of one of the primaries, as the types of the birds are distinct according to the commentary in the 11/03 Cover Letter. There is a second CD for changing the orientation of the bird (by RfS X.4.h).

Name and device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Catherine de la Loire - New Device:

Purpure, a Catherine's wheel missing the chief dexter quarter, between three fleurs-de-lys argent.

[Name] Her name was registered 03/04.

[Armory] We believe the 3/4 Catherine's wheel is justifiable based upon period arms that included similar, fractional charges. Bruce Oak Leaf points out:

While I couldn't find any examples of 3/4 wheels, I did find an example of a 1/4 wheel (von Billick, Siebmacher plate 71: Gules, a quarter of a wheel, hub to base argent, and plenty of examples of 1/2 wheels (of which the best example is Rusetzker, Siebmacher plate 73: Gules, the dexter half of a wheel argent). Given 1/4 wheels and 1/2 wheels, a 3/4 wheel is not improbable at all.

This form appears to have been photo reduced some time prior to submission. The emblazon is not so small as to be returnable for this reason.

Device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


*Cera Foxmor - New Name and New Device:

Per pale argent and vert, a fox's mask counterchanged.

[Name] Submitted as Cera Foxmoor. The submitter wishes a feminine name. She permits all changes, and if the name must be changed, she is most interested in the sound.

Cera is found in OCM (s.n. Cera, p. 50), who cite "three virgin saints of the name whose feast-days fell on 5 February, 8 February and 9 September." This is the early form of the name; the later form is given as Ceara.

Foxmor is a constructed locative. Fox- "fox" is found in Ekwall's Oxford Guide to English Place Names, p.186, as a prototheme, e.g. Foxcote 1146, 1316, Foxhole 1254, Foxham 1065, Foxton 1202, Foxden 1487. The deuterotheme -mor "moor, fen" is likewise found in Ekwall, e.g. Blakemor 1243 (p.47). We have changed the spelling to match period spellings.

The mixture of Irish Gaelic and English is considered a weirdness, q.v. Ian MacHenrik, 10/99.

[Armory] This form appears to have been photo reduced some time prior to submission. The emblazon is not so small as to be returnable for this reason.

Name approved as changed and forwarded to Laurel. Device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


*Dreiburgen, Barony of - Kingdom Resub Order Name for Protectors of Dreiburgen

[Name] The name of the Barony of Dreiburgen was registered 10/76. They claim this to be a resubmission of the Defenders of the Tower, but we have no record of this name ever being submitted to Kingdom. The current submission is unacceptably generic, according to precedent (LoAR cover letter, December 2002):

Generic identifiers are descriptions that may be associated with registered items (mainly badges) to identify the use of that item. Unlike registered names (award names, order names, guild names, household names, et cetera), generic identifiers are not registered as an independent item and are not protected from conflict. This does not mean that the group may not use this identifier, but simply that we will not limit the usage of that identifier to a single group.

Names that fall into the generic identifier category are names that would reasonably be used by more than one branch for common functions of the branch. All kingdoms can have a university. All baronies can have a baronial guard. All groups can have an equestrian guild.

Adding the name of the branch to the description does not affect generic identifiers (because branch identifiers are transparent for conflict). As an example, Outlands Equestrian Guild falls into the generic category because the only thing that would differentiate it from Equestrian Guild of Calontir are the branch identifiers Outlands and of Calontir.

Name returned for using a generic designator.


Dreiburgen, Barony of - Kingdom Resub Order Name for Defenders of the Three Towers of Dreiburgen

[Name] The name of the Barony of Dreiburgen was registered 10/76. Upon discovering that Defenders of the Tower(s) was never submitted, they chose to submit it now -- after much discussion, in this form.

The OED cites the word tower in this spelling and meaning to 1526. In the May 03 LoAR (Kingdom of Artemisia, Order of the Defenders of the Citadel), Laurel noted: "An issue was raised whether Defenders would have been used in a period order name. However, Defender and Defenders have been used so often in awards and order names, including as generic designators, that this term has become part of SCA culture. Therefore, it is reasonable to declare use of Defender and Defenders in an order or award name to be SCA compatible."

This was submitted as Defenders of the Towers of Dreiburgen. However, they already have Order of the Towers of Dreiburgen registered to them, and this was considered a duplicate submission. After much discussion, this was changed to the above form. The final form of the name is allusive to the Baronial arms.

The College received forms signed by the baron, baroness, seneschal, and herald. However, the forms were for an earlier version of the submission (Protectors of Dreiburgen). After telephonic consultation with the Baron and Baroness, we're using the signatures on the old forms and applying them to this.

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


*Dreiburgen, Barony of - New Badge:

Argent, on a pile inverted throughout azure an escutcheon argent, within a bordure embattled azure.

[Name] The name of the Barony of Dreiburgen was registered 10/76. The form is signed by the baron, baroness, seneschal, and herald.

[Armory] The badge is to be associated with the Defenders of the Three Towers of Dreiburgen, submitted above. The form of blazon is taken from another badge of Dreiburgen (09/82), Argent, on a pile inverted throughout azure a tower argent, within a bordure embattled azure.

The emblazon on this form is smaller than the required 4 ½" diameter due to use of online forms printed with "Shrink to fit" turned ON. As this is a newly-discovered difficulty, we will not return this badge for this reason. The form will be redrawn prior to being sent to Laurel.

Badge approved and forwarded to Laurel.


*Fergal MacCome - Kingdom Resub Device:

Per bend sinister gules and argent, a spear bendwise sinister Or and a brown ape passant proper

[Name] His name was registered 01/99.

[Armory] His previous submission, Per bend sinister gules and argent, a bend sinister vert between a catapult Or and a monkey sable, was returned by Crescent at the 01/03 meeting for redraw. As more than one year has elapsed between submission, this is a paid resubmission.

Device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


*Ranðulfr Þorfinnsson - New Name

[Name] The submitter is interested in an Icelandic masculine name, though he did not check the box requesting changes to make the name authentic. He will accept minor but not major changes, and if the name must be changed he cares most about the sound.

Ranðulfr is found in Withycombe (s.n. Randal, p. 249). The author states that the name Randal "was current in England before the Norman Conquest, after which it was reinforced by the corresponding name derived from Norse Ranðulfr." We have been unable to find any corroboration in either Geirr Bassi or in Searle. We ask the College's help in documenting Ranðulfr.

Þorfinnr is found as a masculine given name on p. 16 of Geirr Bassi. The patronymic is formed according to the rules on p. 17 of Geirr Bassi.

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Steinsee, Canton of (Dreiburgen)

*Connor Dubh - Kingdom Resub Name

[Name] The submitter is interested in a masculine name. He will accept minor but not major changes, and if the name must be changed he cares most about the meaning (unspecified). His previous submission, Connor Black, was returned by Crescent 04/04 for conflict with Conor the Black.

Connor is found in OCM (s.n. Conchobar, p. 57) as a popular name in the later Middle Ages. Connor is "the most acceptable form in English".

Dubh is found in Woulfe's Irish Names and Surnames, p.284 (s.n. Du{b.}), meaning "black". The mixture of Gaelic and English is considered a weirdness, q.v. Ian MacHenrik, 10/99.

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Gyldenholt, Barony of

*Amandina Massarin - New Name

[Name] The submitter will accept minor but not major changes; no other boxes were marked.

Amandina is a feminine Italian given name found in De Felice Nomi (s.n. Armando, p. 59-60), undated. The author indicates that the name is used in the North and in Tuscany.

Massarin is found in De Felice Cognomi (s.n. Massari, p. 164), undated. The author indicates that it is popular throughout Italy.

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


*Angus MacIver of Stirling - New Name and New Badge:

(Fieldless) On an anvil argent, a rose gules.

[Name] The submitter does not care about the gender of the name. He will allow all changes and if the name must be changed he cares most about the sound.

Angus is found in Black (s.n. Angus, p. 23) dated c. 761, 1204, and 1211. In addition, on p. 519 under the heading Mackintosh, Black dates Angus to 1557.

MacIver is found in Black (s.n. MacIver, p. 520); it is undated. The closest period spelling with a similar pronunciation is McEvir, dated to 1541. We are forwarding the name as submitted, with this alternate should Laurel deem it necessary to change it.

Stirling is found in Johnson, Place-Names of Scotland, p. 300 where it is dated to c. 1124.

Name and Badge approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Caterucia Bice da Ghicceto - New Device:

Per fess azure and sable a dove volant and a fleur-de-lys argent.

[Name] The submitter's name was registered 04/04.

[Armory] The depiction of the bird is 3-D (trian aspect), so it is being returned for a redraw. We found no conflicts

Device returned for redraw.


Edgar Chissik - Kingdom Resub Device:

Per pale azure and purpure a skull wearing a fool's cap between three spider webs couped argent.

[Name] The submitter's name appeared on Caid's March 29th LoI.

[Armory] His previous submission, Azure, a sword inverted proper, the blade fletched along its entire length Or, was returned by Crescent 03/04 for lack of period style, identifiability, and blazonability. This is a complete redesign.

We are returning this to be redrawn. We recommend that the artist use white, not silver, to draw the spider web. The skull should not be drawn in trian aspect. Several members immediately recognized the emblem as a character from the comic "Poison Elves", though we do not believe that it is important enough to protect. As a warning to the submitter, we are unsure if multiple spider webs are registerable.

Device returned for redraw.


*Eymund víss - New Name and New Device:

Argent, a dragonfly bendwise sable winged gules.

[Name] Submitted as Eymund Víss. The submitter is interested in a masculine name.

Eymund is a given name found in "Vikings in Russia" (KWHS Proceedings, Atlantia, 1991); it is taken from Eymund's Saga. It is also found in Geirr Bassi, p.9, in the spelling Eymundr.

víss is found in Geirr Bassi, p. 29, as a byname meaning "learned" or "wise". Submitted as Víss (capitalized), we have changed the spelling to lowercase to match period practice.

[Armory] A letter of permission of conflict with Ysenda de Gray's device, Argent, a dragonfly bendwise gules winged sable (name and device submitted below) is included.

This form appears to have been photo reduced some time prior to submission. The emblazon is not so small as to be returnable for this reason.

Name approved as changed and forwarded to Laurel. Device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Giuseppe Francesco da Borgia - New Badge:

Per saltire gules and sable, a cherub Or.

[Name] The submitter's name was registered 08/94.

[Armory] This may conflict with the badge of the Barony of the Angels, submitted at this same meeting: Gules, a seraph Or, face proper. There's a CD for the field. We hold there is a CD between seraph and cherub; the number of wings should be worth difference, just as there's a difference between a mullet of five points and a mullet of eight points. If these are deemed to conflict, we note that Giuseppe's badge was submitted first, and takes precedence. Giuseppe has provided a letter of permission to conflict.

The emblazon on this form is smaller than the required 4 ½" diameter due to use of online forms printed with "Shrink to fit" turned ON. As this is a newly-discovered difficulty, we will not return this badge for this reason. The form will be redrawn prior to being sent to Laurel.

Badge approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Giuseppe Francesco da Borgia - New Badge:

Gules, a lion of St. Mark sejant guardant and on a chief Or three fleurs-de-lys sable.

[Name] The submitter's name was registered 08/94.

[Armory] A lion of St. Mark is by definition a winged lion maintaining a book.

Badge approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Nichola inghean Domhnaill - New Name and New Device:

Vert, a mermaid in her vanity between three escallops inverted argent.

[Name] The submitter has not checked any boxes.

Nichola is documented from S. Gabriel report number 1724, which states "We have an example of <Nichola> in Scots in the 14th century [1], and it probably continued in use into the 15th century. The final <a> was probably only a scribal addition; it's likely that the lady was actually called <Nichol>." Reference [1] is Talan Gwynek, "A List of Feminine Personal Names found in Scottish Records" (WWW: J. Mittleman, 1996). http://www.panix.com/~mittle/names/talan/scottishfem/

inghean is the post-1200 Gaelic "daughter of."

Domhnaill is documented from S. Gabriel report 1833, which states "<Domnall> is also a pre-1200 spelling. By your period, the name was spelled <Domhnall> [3]. In your name, the proper construction is <inghean Domhnaill>. The extra <i> puts the name into its genitive (possessive) form. The phrase means "Domhnall's daughter" and was pronounced \IN-yen DOH-nahl\." Reference [3] is O/ Corra/in, Donnchadh and Fidelma Maguire, _Irish Names_ (Dublin: The

Lilliput Press, 1990), s.n. Domnall.

This name mixes Scots (a language closely related to English) and Gaelic. This is considered a weirdness, or one step from period practice (q.v. Elspeth O'Shea, 02/00).

[Armory] The device may conflict with that of Jason Seaborn (reg. Jan. 73): Vert, a merman proper, crined Or, orbed sable, tailed argent, grasping in the dexter hand a trident argent. There's a CD for adding the secondary charges. The changes to tincture and gender of the primary charge are worth no difference. If the trident is a sustained charge, this is clear; otherwise this is a conflict. In communication with Laurel, we were informed, "The trident [in Jason Seahorn's armory] is about as tall as the merman from head to knee (the bottom of the curve of the tail), but it's not nearly as long as the full merman (head to tail-tip)." Given this, we believe the trident should be ruled sustained as was the case in the following precedent:

The sword in this emblazon is as long as the sea-lion is tall. The sea-lion has notably more visual weight than the sword because the sea-lion is many times wider than the sword. This lead some members of the College to question whether the sword should be considered a maintained charge rather than a sustained charge. However, there is precedent indicating that the sword in this emblazon should be considered a sustained charge:

[a bear rampant contourny sustaining a halberd] Regarding the "significance" of the halberd, as Green Crown noted, a charge consisting mostly of a long skinny handle will always have difficulty matching the visual weight of other charges, but here the sizes of the charges are about the same as would be expected if they were in fess a bear and a halberd. That seems to be a reasonable rule of thumb for determining sustained (and qualifying for a CD), as opposed to maintained (and not qualifying for a CD), charges. (LoAR September 1994 p. 9)

In arms with a sea-lion and a sword in fess, the sword would be as long as the sea-lion is tall. Therefore, this sword should be considered a sustained charge. [Atlantia, Kingdom of, 02/02]

Name and device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


*Rutilia Fausta - Laurel Resub Name and New Device:

Per fess embattled Or and gules, a dragonfly sable and two lightning bolts in saltire Or

[Name] Submitted as Fausta Rutilia. The submitter is interested in a feminine name authentic for 1st-2nd century Roman. She permits all changes, but will not allow the formation of a holding name. The previous name submission, Fausta Cornelia Rutilia, was returned by Laurel in 03/02 with the note:

This name is being returned for lack of documentation of the construction, since the submitted name does not fit classical Roman naming patterns. Metron Ariston summarizes the situation:

In theory and to a great extent in practice all the daughters in a family would go by the feminine form of their father's nomen. That is where you get Claudia, Julia, Caecilia, Cornelia, etc. If you had two daughters they would be Claudia Maior and Claudia Minor (the older and younger). If you were unlucky enough to have more, they'd be numbered: Julia Tertia, for example. In the Republic women usually did not get cognomina of their own, but not infrequently would use an inherited one. Thus, Caecilia Metella, the wife of the Roman dictator Sulla, was the daughter of Lucius Caecilius Metellus Dalmaticus. Lucius was his given name. Caecilius was the primary clan name. Metellus was an inherited clan cognomen. [...] Dalmaticus was a personal cognomen referring to his military victories in Dalmatia. His daughter used the feminine forms of the primary nomen and the inherited cognomen. [...]

Fausta derives from the masculine cognomen Faustus, Cornelia from the nomen Cornelius and Rutilia from the nomen Rutilius. Therefore the name is cognomen + nomen + nomen which is not documented.

Given this information, Cornelia Fausta and Rutilia Fausta would be registerable forms of this name. However, as the submitter does not allow major changes, we were unable to change the name to one of these forms in order to register the name.

Additionally, the LoI listed Roman women who had names that contained three elements. In both cases, the women were the wives of emperors, and names of members of the imperial family were often more elaborate than was typical for the time. At this time, the use of three element names for women, while largely limited to imperial women, does not seem to be exclusive enough that use of this construction, on its own, would be considered presumptuous. However, as with any name, three element names must follow a documented construction. The submitted Fausta Cornelia Rutilia has the construction cognomen + nomen + nomen, which is not a documented construction pattern.

This was resubmitted as Fausta Rutilia, which maintains the same problem as noted in the return: the elements are in the order cognomen + nomen, instead of nomen + cognomen. Since she accepts all changes, we are changing the order of the name elements, making it one of the suggestions that Laurel said would be registerable. We also request the College's help in documenting the form submitted, Fausta Rutilia.

Rutilia is the feminine form of Rutilius, found in the name of Rutilius Rufus, a Roman consul in the age of Sulla (i.e., the 1st Century BC) (q.v., Lempriere's Classical Dictionary, p.552).

Fausta is the feminine form of Faustus, an obscure poet under the first Roman emperors (ibid, p.242); Fausta is also the name of a daughter of Sulla.

[Armory] We note that the dragonfly is badly drawn, and ask the submitter to draw it more recognizably in the future. However, this seems to be acceptable in its current form and thus we are forwarding it to Laurel.

This form appears to have been photo reduced some time prior to submission. The emblazon is not so small as to be returnable for this reason.

Name and device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


*Ysenda de Gray - New Name and New Device:

Argent, a dragonfly bendwise gules winged sable.

[Name] The submitter is interested in a feminine name. The name is written in all capitol letters. We have corrected the capitalization.

Ysenda is found in Black, p.291 (s.n. Gask), where Ysenda, countess of Earl Gilbert of Strathern, is dated to c.1208.

de Gray is found in Black, p.325 (s.n. Gray), where Hugo de Gray is cited to a. 1248.

[Armory] A letter of permission of conflict with Eymund víss's device, Argent, a dragonfly bendwise sable winged gules (name and device submitted above) is included.

This form appears to have been photo reduced some time prior to submission. The emblazon is not so small as to be returnable for this reason.

Name and device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Heatherwyne, Shire of

*Abigail Robertson - New Name

[Name] The submitter is interested in a feminine name. She will accept all changes and if the name must be changed she cares most about the language/culture (unspecified, presumably English).

Abigail is a feminine given name found in Withycombe (header, p. 1), dated to the 16th C.

Robertson is found in R&W (header, p. 380), with the spelling "Robertsone" dated to 1307.

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


*Geoffrey Bowman - New Name

[Name] The submitter is interested in a masculine name. He allows all changes, and if the name must be changed he cares most about the language/culture (unspecified, presumably English).

Geoffrey is a masculine given name found in Withycombe (header, p. 128), where it states "it was common in England from the 12th to 15th C...".

Bowman is a found in R&W (s.n. Bowman, pp. 57-58), where it is dated to 1279 in the spelling Bouman. Bardsley dates the submitted spelling to 1570 (s.n. Bowman, p. 124).

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


*Guendolen Pengrych - New Name

[Name] Submitted as Guendolyn Pengrych. The submitter is interested in a feminine name. She allows all changes and, if the name must be changed, she cares most about the language/culture (not specified, but we assume Welsh based on the documentation). If possible, she would prefer the spelling Guendolyn with a Y.

Guendolen is found as the header spelling in Withycombe, p.140; no dates are given. Precedent states:

Wherefore art thou Gwendolyn? Two submissions this month raised the question of the name Gwendolyn. To quote Harpy Herald: 'Gwendolyn is a modern spelling variant of the name of a fictional character (Guendolen) in the Historia Regum Brittaniae whose name is based on a misreading of the masculine name Guendoleu. The name was not in common use in period, in my experience, although it certainly is in the SCA. We should probably just go ahead and declare it in the same category as Ceridwen and Rhiannon as "not historically justifiable but too deeply rooted to get rid of without a fuss".' The name is certainly quite common in the SCA: in one spelling or another it has been registered to more than 50 different people. Given this level of popularity, I am reluctant to ban the name outright despite the lack of any real justification for it. I am equally reluctant to extend the allowance to modern forms of the name, however. Therefore the name will henceforth be considered 'SCA-compatible' in the forms Guendolen and Gwendolen but not the modern Gwendolyn, and the underlying principle will be extended to any other forms that are proposed. (This decision can be thought of as an extension of the 'Rule of Two Weirdnesses': the name itself is one weirdness, and a modern spelling is another.) (Talan Gwynek, Cover Letter with the August 1995, p. 2)

Given this precedent, upheld as recently as 11/99 (q.v. Gwendolyn of the Isle of Wight, 11/99, R-Meridies]), we cannot forward her preferred spelling.

Pengrych is found in A Welsh Miscellany by Heather Rose Jones (Compleat Anachronist #66), p.32; the byname was "taken from a variety of period legal documents and genealogies" with the meaning of "curly head".

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Isles, Shire of

*Alys Grée - New Name and New Device:

Argent, within a Coptic cross throughout a triskele all within a bordure sable

[Name] The submitter is interested in a feminine name. She will accept minor but not major changes, and if the name must be changed she cares most about the sound and the language/culture (which she doesn't specify).

Alys is found in Withycombe (s.n. Alice, pp.15-16), where it is described as "very common" in medieval England and France. Withycombe dates this spelling to the 15th century.

Grée is found in Dauzat (p. 305). "...nom de domaine or de petit village = endroit pierreux." (place-name or village name = rocky place)

[Armory] The Coptic cross is an SCA charge, equivalent to a cross nowy pierced.

This form appears to have been photo reduced some time prior to submission. The emblazon is not so small as to be returnable for this reason.

Name and device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Hortensia de Tarentaise - New Device:

Azure, a rabbit sejant erect between three bunches of grapes argent

[Name] Her name was registered 07/03.

[Armory] Noted at the meeting was the possible conflict with Richard Blackbury (06/80), Azure, a rabbit sejant erect proper playing a harp or, between three mullets argent. After the meeting, Laurel was contacted and a scan of Richard's device was provided. The rabbit in Richard's device is, in fact brown in color, and thus we have a clear difference for change in color of primary charge, in addition to the CD for changes in secondary charges. The harp in Richard's device is not quite of equal visual weight to the rabbit and therefore its removal is probably not a clear difference, despite the fact that it is larger than all of the secondary mullets combined. We request that Laurel consider reblazoning Richard Blackbury's device to clarify the color of the rabbit and the importance of the harp.

This form appears to have been photo reduced some time prior to submission. The emblazon is not so small as to be returnable for this reason.

Device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Lyondemere, Barony of

*Estienne Duran - New Name

[Name] the submitter is interested in a feminine name authentic for 14th century France. She will accept minor but not major changes, and if the name must be changed she cares most about the language/culture (French).

Estienne is found as a feminine given name in Colm Dubh's "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/paris.html), which lists Estienne une fame.

Duran is found in Dauzat (s.n. Durand, p. 225). "...var plus rare of Durand--nom de famille; ancien nom de bapt." (A very rare variant of Durand--a family name and a former given name.)

Unfortunately, this conflicts with Etienne Durant, 03/81.

Name returned for conflict.


*Franchesca MacBeth - New Device Change:

Vert, a Gothic letter M Or, a base embattled argent masoned sable

[Name] Her name was registered 01/03.

[Armory] This is either a low "per fess" or a high "base". We note that if it were per fess, this device would consist of a field and a sole abstract charge and would be returned for that reason. Hence, we are blazoning this with the base. We are returning it for a redraw because the form has been reduced more than 15% and will be returned by Wreath Herald as too small. Since the submitter must redraw it, we recommend that she reduce the number of rows of masonry by one (3 rows plus embattling), keeping their proportions the same.

Device returned for redraw.


Gwion Conwy - New Name

[Name] The submitter is interested in a Welsh masculine name, though he did not check the box requesting changes to make the name authentic. He will allow minor but not major changes, and if the name must be changed he cares most about the meaning "elf".

Gwion is a given name found in Morgan & Morgan (s.n. Gwion, p.113), where it is dated to 1292.

Conwy is found in Morgan & Morgan (s.n. Conway, p. 74), where it notes that "the origin of the form is the name of the river Conwy." Hugh Conwy Hen undated; William Conoway is dated to 1406

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


*Mathea Volpella da Perusia - New Name Change from Muirenn inghean mhic Criomhthainn

[Name] Her current name, Muirenn inghean mhic Criomhthainn, was registered 08/01. The submitter is interested in a feminine name. If the name must be changed she cares most about the language/culture (Central Italy). While no changes are allowed according to the boxes, the submitter notes "I will accept a change to the accent on the "e" but I will not accept a change to strike or modify the suffix or to change any of the three names without my prior approval." If this name is registered, she wishes to have the old name released. Submitted as Mathea Volpèlla da Perusia, we note that accent marks in De Felicia are simply pronunciation guides.

The naming pattern is documented from an article at the West Kingdom College of Heralds website (http://heralds.westkingdom.org/ClassHandouts/CommonNamingPatterns.htm#ByCulture), which gives [GIVEN] + [GIVEN (opt)] + [BYNAME] + [BYNAME (opt)]. The article notes "By the 15th century, however, it is possible to find examples of individuals recorded with two given names and individuals with two bynames."

Mathea is from "Feminine Given Names from Thirteenth Century Perguia" by Arval Benicoeur (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/perugia/perugiaFemAlpha.html)

Volpella is found in De Felice's Cognomi (s.n. Volpe, p. 266); it is undated. Volpe is found as a family name in the Online Catasto of 1427 (http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/catasto/newsearch/family_names.html). The "List of Family Names" at the same site shows -ella as a suffix, e.g., Bardella, Gambella, and Pianella. The West Kingdom CoH article (cited above) notes "An additional kind of byname related to the patronym is the family name. A famous family might combe to be known by its own name, such as the Medici family, and members of the family might be known by that name. This was done in late period using the preposition dei: Giuliano dei Medici, Giovanni dei Querni, though the dei was optional: Cosimo Medici.

Perusia is found "Mercator's Place Names of Italy in 1554" by Maridonna Benvenuti (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/maridonna/mercator/center.html). It is listed as a "Town/City; Probably modern Perugia"; it is in Central Italy. Perusia is also found in "Feminine Given Names from Thirteenth Century Perguia" by Arval Benicoeur (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/perugia/perugiaFemAlpha.html) as a given name. The West Kingdom CoH article (cited above) notes "In northern Italy, locatives are formed using the preposition da, followed by the name of the town."

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


OP Notes

None.


Bibliography

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