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Minutes of the 8 February 2004 Meeting

[Note: These submissions appear on the Jul 04 LoAR]

Notes and Announcements

In attendance were: Jeanne Marie Crescent, Lachlan Dolphin, Su Battlement, Selene Aurum, Christopher Golden Rose, Hrorek Chevron, Gwynedd, Thomas Brownell, Perrin Le Blanc, Damien Sable Fret, Vivienne de Lampérière, Una Bellows, Kean Trident, Sarah Minet, Angus Seraph, Islyle le Gannocker de Gavain, Cormac Mór, Adrianna von Volgelsang, Rotheric Kynith and Ryan of Rickford.

Commingling of funds - Submitting heralds are submitting personal checks, after accepting funds from submitter. This commingling of funds is not acceptable practice. If the submitter pays in cash, the submission should be accompanied by cash. Converting cash to money orders is acceptable for mailed submissions.

Documentation - Recently, some submissions have been received without any documentation. This requires extra work on the part of the college and serves to lengthen meetings. Try to add documentation for submissions, if available.

Submitting format - It is helpful if summaries provided prior to the meeting be as close as possible to their final formatting. Examine the minutes to see the preferred format. At a minimum, summaries should include a summary of the submitter's wishes (submitted spellings, boxes on name forms, proposed emblazon if any, etc).

Spring Collegium classes are set and can be found online. The Collegium Regent Su is looking for classes for fall Collegeum. She is especially interested in classes on armorial display. Su is also looking for deputy Collegium Regent.

Precedents are available from Trumpet Press West, including precedents from Elsbeth's tenure. For François's tenure, draft armory precedents are current through May 2003. Name precedents are about six months behind.

The next heraldry meetings will be: March 7th, April 4th, May 23rd, June 13th, and July 11th. Doomsday reports are now overdue - if you haven't submitted yours, please do so ASAP.

Results from the October LoAR were read.

Approved submissions will be forwarded to Laurel on the March 29, 2004 Letter of Intent.


Caid, Kingdom of

Caid, Kingdom of - Administrative (Change of designator for badge, Azure, four crescents conjoined in saltire, horns outward, argent).

The kingdom's name was registered 02/75. Azure, four crescents conjoined in saltire, horns outward, argent was registered to Caid 08/79 with the designation "War Banner". This is currently used as a populace badge and is generally the preferred form for augmentations of arms granted within the kingdom. The October 2003 Cover Letter notes that if a badge is designated "for augmentation", a specific letter of permission to conflict is not required when an augmentation is submitted. Given this we wish to change the designator to "Populace Badge and for Augmentation". Crescent notes that if the dual designation is not allowed, then "and for Augmentation" should be dropped. A letter requesting this change is included and is signed by Direk, Rex Caidis, and Levana, Regina Caidis, as well as by Crescent.

Approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Caid, Kingdom of - New Award Name (Sigillum Regis).

The kingdom's name was registered 02/75. The submitters will accept all changes. The form is signed by Direk, Rex Caidis, and Levana, Regina Caidis. Crescent signed as the submitter. This award is given by the king to those who aided and supported his reign. The form of the award name is grandfathered to the kingdom as Signum Reginae was registered to Caid 04/81.

Sigillum is Latin for "stamped or embossed figure, a relief", which is the form this award takes. This is documented from The Latin Dictionary (s.n. sigillum, p. 388).

Regis is Latin for "king's"; it is the genitive form of rex (king). Also from The Latin Dictionary (s.n. rex, p. 368).

Submitted as Sigilum Regis, we have corrected the spelling to Sigillum Regis.

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Caid, Kingdom of - New Award Name (Signum Regni).

The kingdom's name was registered 02/75. The submitters will accept all changes. The form is signed by Direk, Rex Caidis, and Levana, Regina Caidis. Crescent signed as the submitter. This award is given by the Crown to those who aided and supported their reign. This is given instead of the individual awards (Signum Reginae and Sigillum Regis). The form of the award name is grandfathered to the kingdom as Signum Reginae was registered to Caid 04/81.

Signum is Latin for "seal; sign, indication, proof". This is documented from The Latin Dictionary (s.n. signum, p. 388).

Regni is Latin for "monarchy's"; this is the genitive form of regnum (monarchy). Also from The Latin Dictionary (s.n. regnum, p. 361).

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Altavia, Barony of

Sorcha inghean mhic an Ghabhann - New Device:

Argent, on a hurst of pine trees vert, a cat sejant guardant argent spotted sable

Her name appears on Caid's 11/21 LoAR.

A majority of those present could not identify the cat. The submitter is advised to draw the trees and the cat larger. Identifiablity would also be improved if the cat's tail was not sable and there were fewer black markings.

Returned for redraw.


John Morgan of Caerleon - New Device:

Per pale sable and purpure, in saltire two scythes argent

His name was registered 03/00.

Device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Angels, Barony of

Macha Drake - New Device:

Argent, a dragon within a bordure azure

Her name appears on Caid's January 31st LoI.

Conflict with Evet Drachenklaue (08/01), Argent, a dragon segreant azure within a bordure sable, with a single CD for changing the tincture of the bordure. The submitter is advised not to use colored pencils upon resubmission.

Device returned for conflict.


Rose Annabie - New Name and New Device:

Argent a pall vert between two roses azure barbed and seeded proper

The submitter is interested in a feminine name authentic for 16th C. English though she didn't check the box to make the name authentic. She will accept all changes and if the name must be changed, she cares most about the sound.

Rose is a feminine given name found in Withycombe (s.n. Rose, p. 258), where it is dated in this spelling to 1316.

Annabie is found in Juile Stampnitzky's "Surnames in Durham and Northumberland, 1521-1613" at http://yucs.org/~jules/names/parish/surnames_a.html where it is dated to 1613 and 1614.

Name and device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


William of Shirwell - New Name and New Device:

Erminois, a griffin contourny and on a chief indented sable three estoilles Or

The submitter wants a masculine name authentic for 14th century English but did not check the box to make the name authentic. He will accept all changes, and if the name must be changed, he cares most about the language/culture.

William is found in Withycombe (s.n. William, p 293); it was introduced into England by the Normans in the 11th century.

Shirwell is the header spelling in Mills (p. 311) where it is shown as Sirewelle in 1086. Header spellings are generally registerable, and as the submitter did not request changes to make his name authentic, we are sending it to Laurel as submitted.

Name and device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Calafia, Barony of

Caitriona Mac Donaghy - New Name.

The submitter is interested in a feminine name. She will accept minor but not major changes; and if the name must be changed she cares most about the sound.

Caitriona is in OC&M (s.n. Caiterina, p. 45). From a 4th C saint, influenced in this form by Old French.

Mac Donaghy is in MacLysaght, (s.n. (Mac) Donaghy, p.85). A variant of Mac Donagh. Undated.

Conflict with Catriona MacDhonnachaidh (2/90, via Middle).

Name returned for conflict.


Danyel de Licatia - New Device:

Purpure, a sea-horse argent and on a chief wavy Or a bow inverted gules

Her name was registered 11/03.

Device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Donn na Gall Ui Neill - New Name.

The submitter is interested in a masculine name. He will accept minor but not major changes, and if the name must be changed, he cares most about the sound of the given name ("Donegal"). He explicitly will accept Donngal Ui Neill if necessary to register the name. Crescent contacted the submitter and confirmed that, if necessary, he will drop Ui Neill.

Donn is found in OC&M (s.n. Donn, pp. 75-76) where it states "In the later medieval period, Donn was a popular name among the Maguires and the O Kennedys...".

Donngal is found in OC&M (s.n. Donngal, pp. 76-77) where it states, "One of the more common names in early medieval Ireland." The later spelling is Donnghal.

The submitter states na Gall means "the traveler". MacLysaght (s.n. Gaule, p. 120) lists Mac an Ghaille and states "gall, foreigner". The surname is undated.

Ui Neill means a descendant of Niall. MacLysaght (s.n. (O) Neill, p. 234) gives the Gaelic form Ó Néill and notes, "The main family of the O'Neills, dominant in Tyrone up to the collapse of the Gaelic system in the seventeenth century...". Tangwystl's "100 Most Popular Men's Names in Early Medieval Ireland" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/irish100.html) includes Niall; Néill is the genitive form.

"Index of Names in Irish Annals" by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Gall.shtml) has the example Dondchad nGall mac Domnaill h. Conchobair dated to 1328.

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Gamel of Motrum - New Device:

Per bend sinister gules and sable, a gamelyon rampant to sinister argent

His name was registered 11/03.

Documentation for a gamelyon is included (p. 142 in Dennys' Heraldic Imagination):

This odd creature makes but one appearance in armory and was evidently conjured up in the mind of Sir William Dethick, Garter King of Arms, who granted to Thomas Gardner of South Brent in Somerset, in July 1557, the following arms: Quarterly gules and azure on a Bend cotised or between two 'Gamelyons rampant and Volant supporting in their forefoote a Ring or with a Garnett proper' or a Lion's head caboshed of the first with a buckle in his mouth silver between two Fleur de Lys sable. In the Queen's College version the beasts are depicted in trick with lion's body, legs, feet, and tail, indeterminate bead with slightly turned up snout, and Dragon's wings. In two College of Arms manuscripts they are depicted like Dragons rampant, while another depicts them like Griffins segreant. Clearly Sir William Dethick had his contemporaries guessing; but as he was considered the most skilful herald of his day, and a member of the original Society of Antiquaries, it is likely that he had some reason for creating this creature.

The consulting herald notes that the blazon gamelyon is more important to the submitter than the emblazon is. While this could be blazoned as a bat-winged lion, it does not match the emblazon found in Dennys. If this is resubmitted with an emblazon that matches that in Dennys, we will send it up as a gamelyon. We note that Wreath may still reblazon the resulting critter as a winged lion or return it as a unique (or unidentifiable) charge.

Returned for redraw.


Joseph Archer - New Name.

The submitter is interested in a masculine name. He will accept minor but not major changes. No other boxes are marked.

Joseph is in Withycombe (s.n. Joseph, pp.180-181), where it states "during the Middle Ages it was in regular though infrequent use."

Archer is found in Reaney & Wilson (s.n. Archer, p.13) where Hugh le Archer is dated to 1199 and Edward Archier is dated to 1166. If the name must be changed, the submitter prefers le Archer to Archier.

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Odile Davignon - New Name and Device:

Azure, in pale a lotus blossom in profile and three chevronels braced argent

The submitter is interested in a feminine name. She will accept minor but not major changes; and if the name must be changed she cares most about the language/culture (French).

Odile is a feminine given name in Dauzat (s.n. Odelin, p. 455). It is the name of a saint from Alsace, 7th-8th C. It was later used as a matronym, according to Dauzat.

Davignon is in Dauzat (s.n. Davigneau, p. 179). The entry says that it was originally d'Avigneau or d'Avignon. If necessary, the submitter will accept d'Avignon.

Possible conflict with Gilmirron of the Blue Flame (10/76), Azure, a globe amaranth flower [Gomphrena globosa] argent. If the lotus blossom is considered a secondary, these are clear by X1. If the lotus blossom is co-primary, then the question becomes whether there is a CD between a lotus blossom in profile and a globe amaranth flower. If there's not a CD, then Odile's device conflicts with Gilmirron's badge with a single CD for adding the chevronels. There is another possible conflict with Japan, Emperor of (12/94), Dark, a sixteen-petalled chrysanthemum light by the same reasoning; if there is a CD between a chrysanthemum and a lotus blossom in profile these will be clear. In both cases we believe that there is a CD between the flowers, so this is being forwarded to Laurel.

Name and device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Raven Schneckenburg - New Name.

The submitter does not care about the gender of the name. All changes are allowed.

Raven is in Bahlow/Gentry (1st ed.), p 441, as the header spelling. It is dated in this form to 1359 and 1270. It appears to be a masculine name, but the submitter doesn't care.

Schneckenburg is her husband's name, registered April 2003. We quote that ruling for lack of better documentation:

Listed on the LoI as Hans Schneckenburger, this name was submitted as Hans Schneckenburg and changed at Kingdom to a documented form. The LoI noted that the submitter accepted all changes. However, his form has the "no minor changes" box checked (though the "no major changes" box is unchecked). In cases where the forms are marked in this manner, we interpret the changes allowed as "no changes".

Happily, the submitted form of this name is registerable. Brechenmacher (vol. 1, p. 269 s.n. Tannenberg(er)) dates Joh. Tannenberg to 1508, showing an example of a locative byname formed from the name of a location without using a particle such as von. We have returned this name to the originally submitted form.

Triton notes that Raven's form originally read Schnackenburg, but confirmed by e-mail that she wished to match Hans. This change is marked on the form and initialed by her husband. Crescent is not invoking the Grandfather Clause, as proof of the relationship was not included with the submission.

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Völund the Smith - New Name and Device:

Sable, a talbot statant argent

The submitter is interested in a masculine name. He will accept no changes and if changes must be made, he cares most about the language/culture (unspecified). He will not allow the creation of a holding name.

The documentation on the form reads:

"Title: Myths of the Norsemen (from the eddas and Sagas)
Author: H.A. Guerber
Referenced in: Wayland and the Valkyrs pgs. 175-178"

We note that the reference appears to be to "The Lay of Völund the Smith". We have been unable to document the name in Geirr Bassi or Bahlow, and we believe that the name is unique to the character in the saga. As such Crescent is returning it for using a unique name, in accordance with RfS VI.3. ("Names Claiming Specific Relationships. - Names that unmistakably imply identity with or close relationship to a protected person or literary character will generally not be registered."). If the submitter can provide documentation for the general use of Völund, it may be registerable with a different byname.

The device conflicts with Isabella of Greycliffs (06/83), Per bend sinister embattled sable and vert, a fox passant argent. We advise the submitter that more conflicts are likely but we did not continue looking.

Name returned for presumption. Device returned for conflict.


Darach, Shire of

Brian Mor O'Brian - New Household Name: House of the Silver Moon.

The submitter's personal name was registered 09/02. He will accept all changes.

"English Sign Names" by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, available on the St. Gabriel website at http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/inn/ includes names taken from astronomical objects, e.g. the Star (Sterre, 1322). Also, there construction [color][noun], such as White Horse (Whithors, 1358) and Black Boye (1522) are found in the artice. The submitted name seems compatible with these examples. Precedent states:

No documentation was presented and none was found that Silver would have been used in an English sign name. This topic was recently addressed:

The College was unable to find documentation of Silver used in an English sign name. The registration of Katriona's name states:

Given the documented bynames Whitehors, Blaklamb, Grelamb, Gragris, and Whitecou (this last meaning grey swan), we believe that a pattern of such names has been shown to be established. [Katriona Silverswan, 01/92 LoAR, A-East]

The registration requirements have changed since Katriona's registration in 1992. Lacking evidence of Silver used in an English sign name, Silverswan is not registerable. [...]

Given the examples listed in the January 1992 LoAR and those found by the College, Whiteswan would be registerable as a locative byname derived from a sign name. [Brian Silverswan, LoAR 01/2003, East-R]

Lacking evidence that Silver would have been used in a sign name in period, this household name is not registerable.

However, a month later Laurel ruled:

[Silver Osprey] No documentation was presented and none was found that Silver would have been used as an adjective in an order name in period. Meradudd Cethin's article "Project Ordensnamen OR What do you mean that the Anceint[sic] and Venerable Order of the Most Holy and Righteous Wombat's Toenail isn't period?" (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/order/) lists a number of order names that use a color as an adjective. However, Gold/Golden is the only metal listed as an adjective. Therefore, while these examples support the construction [color] [charge], including Golden as a color, they do not support the construction [any general metal] [charge].

At this time, there are 43 order and award names registered that include Silver as an adjective. At least one order or award name including Silver as an adjective has been registered every year from 1981 to 2002 (inclusive) except for four years. Given this level of popularity, Silver is SCA-compatible for use in order and award names in any position where Golden is appropriate. [Atlantia, Kingdom of, 05/03, A-Atlantia]

In addition, Company of the Silver Spindle was registered as a household name to Atlantia 04/02 without comment.

RfS III.2.b(ii) includes sign names as one pattern for orders and awards. RfS III.2.b(iv) includes inns as one pattern for household names. We believe that if Silver is SCA-compatible for order names, that it should also be compatible for household names.

Household name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Brian Mor O'Brian - New Household name: House of the Black Sword.

The submitter's personal name was registered 09/02. He will accept all changes. This is for a fighting unit.

The unit name seems compatible with those of period fighting units and knightly orders. In particular, we note the Knights of the Sword, founded by the king of Cyprus in 1192 and continuing until 1571; and the Company of the Black Swan, founded in Savoy in 1350. Thus both elements of the submitted name were used by period orders, and there were other constructions of the form [color][noun], including the Order of the Golden Spur (papal order) and the Order of the Golden Shield (founded by Louis de Bourbon). (Information taken from "History of Orders of Chivalry: a Survey" by Francois Velde, available on the St. Gabriel website and at http://heraldica.org/topics/orders/ordhist.htm).

Recent precedent states:

[Brotherhood of the Black Unicorn] Submitted as Brotherhood of the Black Unicorn, the submitter justified the substantive part of the name on the basis of inn-sign names and the designator on the basis of religious groups.

However, RfS III.2.b.iv "Household Names" states that "Household names must follow the patterns of period names of organized groups of people." Period names for different types of organized groups of people followed different patterns. Guild names, inn names, clan names, et cetera, were all formed differently. The patterns for names based on religious groups (and thus appropriate for use with the designator Brotherhood) do not include names of the form [color] + [charge]. Names based on the name of an inn include names of the form [color] + [charge], but are not found using the designator Brotherhood. The designator used with a household name must be compatible with the construction pattern used for the entire household name. Therefore, while both Brotherhood and Black Unicorn are registerable, they are not registerable in combination.

We have changed the designator in this name to House, a designator compatible with the inn-sign model used in the rest of this household name, in order to register this name. [Bjarki Hvítabjarnarson, 10/03, A-Artemisia]

Submitted as Brotherhood of the Black Sword we have changed the name to House of the Black Sword based on this precedent.

Household name approved as changed and forwarded to Laurel.


Brian Mor O'Brian - New Badge:

(Fieldless) An oak leaf palewise ermine

The submitter's personal name was registered 09/02. This is to be a personal badge, unassociated with either of the above household names. The oak leaf is not clearly palewise or clearly bendwise sinister and must therefore must be returned for redraw.

Badge returned for redraw.


Christian Pureheart - New Device Change:

Argent, a Norse sun cross within a mascle formed by two pairs of pine needles, tips crossed sable

The submitter's name was registered 01/92. (Please note that he is currently active in the SCA under the name Matsumori Nausuke, but that name isn't registered.) If this is approved, he would like his current device (Per saltire azure and argent goutty de sang, in pale two crosses crosslet fitchy Or, registered 02/94) retained as a badge.

Returned for lack of ability to identify charges, and thin line heraldry. We are not sure that pine needles are registerable, nor that the arrangement, with two ends crossed and two not crossed, is registerable. If this is resubmitted, please draw the sun cross bolder. Note to the submitter: If you are attending a Kingdom event, please contact Crescent who will willingly bring documentation on Japanese mon.

Device returned for lack of identfiability and for thin-line heraldry.


Nikodemus Volk - New Name and New Device:

Quarterly sable and argent, a double-headed eagle counterchanged

The submitter has marked no boxes.

Nikodemus is a Biblical name. It is dated to 1545 in the Luther edition of the Bible (German), at John 3:1 (http://www.jesus-is-lord.com/germjohn.htm). Withycombe (s.n. Nicodemus, p.228) states that "The apocryphal 'Gosepl of Niocodemus' was very popular in Middle Ages".

Volk is from Bahlow/Gentry (1st ed.) as the header spelling on p. 583; it is dated to 1431.

Name and device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Salomea Imhof - New Name.

No boxes are marked.

Salomea is found in "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" by Talan Gwynek http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/bahlow_v.htm where it is dated to 1446 as Salmey.

Imhof is found undated in Bahlow/Gentry (2nd ed) as the header spelling on p. 244. It is a locative byname meaning "in the courtyard; on the farm".

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Gallavally, Canton of (Dreiburgen)

Douglas Brus - New Name and New Device:

Purpure, a bend embattled-counterembattled, overall a bear rampant argent

The submitter is interested in a masculine name authentic for an unspecified language/culture, though he did not mark the box requesting that it be made authentic. He will accept all changes and, if the name must be changed, he cares most about the unspecified language/culture.

Withycombe (s.n. Douglas, pp. 88-89) notes that Douglas was not used a common Christian name much before late 16th century.

Brus is found in Black (s.n. Bruce, p. 108) where it is dated to 1066-1094 in the forces of William the Conqueror.

Name and device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Gyldenholt, Barony of

Ian Duncanson - New Device:

Argent, a unicorn rampant sable within a bordure quarterly sable and vert

The name was registered 09/01.

Device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Kiriena Dragonsclaw - Kingdom Resub. Name change from William Thespos Dragonsclaw.

The submitter desires a feminine name authentic for "late 1500 - mid 1600's Russian, Romanian, Slavic" though she did not check the box to make it authentic. She will accept any changes, and if the name must be changed, she cares most about the sound. The submitter also lists the following spellings as acceptable, "1) Kieryana Dragonsclaw, 2) Kieriena Dragonsclaw". The submitter's original submission, Kieryana Dragonsclaw was returned by Crescent in January 2004 for lack of documentation.

Kiriena is found in Paul Wickenden of Thanet's "A Dictionary of Period Russian Names 3rd ed" (s.n. Kiriena, p. 147). Kiriena is a feminine name meaning "lady" and is dated "Kiriena, martyr. 3rd Century. [Buk 368]". Kiriena is not the Russian alternate title for lady, that is Pomestnitsa.

Dragonsclaw is grandfathered to the submitter. It was originally registered at some point (apparently August 1979) as Giraldus Dragonsclaw and retained when she changed her name to William Thespos Dragonsclaw in March 1983.

The submitter wishes to release her previous name when this one is registered.

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Mealla Caimbeul - Appeal of Laurel Return.

The submitter desires a feminine name authentic for "12th century Celtic, Scottish preferred, but any British Isle Culture is acceptable", though she did not check the box to make changes to make the name authentic. She will accept all changes and, if the name must be changed, she cares most about the sound.

The text of the appeal follows:

In August, 2003, Laurel returned the submitter's name submission, Mealla Caimbeul, with the comments:

Mealla is the modern form of Mella, which Ó Corráin & Maguire state was the name of the mother of Saint Manchán of Lemanaghan. Precedent states that the names of people mentioned in saints' legends are not registerable:

Ó Corráin & Maguire (p. 46 s.n. Cassair) gives this as the name of a holy virgin included in the legend of Saint Kevin. No evidence has been found that this name was used by humans in period. Names of saints are registerable, regardless of whether they are apocryphal or not. This policy is due to the practice in many cultures (though not in Gaelic) of naming children for saints. (For more details, see the Cover Letter for the September 2001 LoAR.) As Cassair was not herself a saint and the name has not been documented as having been otherwise used in period, it falls into the category of a legendary name and is not registerable. [Cassair Warwick, 02/02, R-Atlantia]

Similarly, as Mealla was not herself a saint and the name has not been documented as having been otherwise used in period, it falls into the category of a legendary name and is not registerable.

This return was based upon the assumption that Mella, mother of Saint Manchán was not herself a saint. Based upon further research, it appears that Mella was herself venerated as a saint in Ireland.

One, possibly two Saints Mella are listed in several online resources:

  • "The Heritage Council" (http://www.heritagecouncil.ie/outlook/contents6/18.html) describes "Saint Mella's Cell" thusly, "Located in Leamonaghan, Co Offaly, St Mella's Cell is an oratory with a surrounding enclosure situated to the east of St Managhan's Church. The oratory is dedicated to the 7th century Saint Mella and would have been used for private prayer."
  • New Advent (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08642a.htm, s.n. Kilmore) states, "On the shores of Lough Melvin in Ballaghameehan, Leitrim, St. Tighernagh founded a convent for his mother St. Mella, who died before 787. It was known as Doiremelle."
  • Terry H Jones' "Patron Saints Index" (part of the Catholic Community Forum. http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/indexsnt.htm) Lists Saint Mella, also known as Mella of Doire-Melle (where she was abbess) who died c.780. This list refers to her canonization as "Pre-Congregation", which the author defines as, "...the beatification and/or canonization of saints and/or beati prior to the institution of the modern investigations performed by the Congregation for the Causes of Saints... It means that the dates for beatification and/or canonization are not available."
  • "Saint Patrick's Church: For All the Saints Index" (http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm) lists Mella of Doire-Melle, Abbess Widow (AC). "Born at Connaught; died c. 780. Saint Mella was the mother of SS. Cannech and Tigernach." "AC" is described by the author as an abbreviation of "a cultus approved by Rome."

According to the College of Arms' previous research, Gaelic cultures did not name their babies after saints. However, the Cover Letter to the September 2001 LoAR states, "...it seems unreasonable at this time to change our current policy by limiting the registerability of saints' names only to cultures where this practice can be solidly documentable. Therefore, if a saint can be documented to period, their given name may be used as a given name in an SCA name."

According to the above precedent, period saints names may be registered as given names in the SCA. Sainte Mella is documented above as having been venerated in period, and therefore her name should be registerable for an SCA given name. Mealla is the modern spelling of the name according to OC&M (s.n. Mell, Mella: Meall, Mealla); "f. This name is derived from an early word for 'lightning'... Mella was the name of the mother of St Manchán of Lemanaghan." The submitter prefers the modern spelling, though will accept the change to "Mella Caimbeul" if necessary to register the name.

The submitter's surname, Caimbeul is documented from Black (s.n. Campbell, p.129) where it is given as the Gaelic spelling, meaning "wry (or crooked mouth)." Black notes "G. Caimbeul, 'wry (or crooked) mouth'. A name probably applied to some early chief of the clan. Compare the name Gifford, i.e. 'fat cheeks,' ans [sic] especially Cameron, Gaelic Camshron, 'wry nose'. There is also a parallel in the nickname of Earl Einar, Thorfinn's son, a great Norse earl of the Orkneys, who was known as 'wry mouth' in ON. The Gaelic form is undated; the earliest dated form is Gillespic Cambel (1293).

We thank Laurel and the College of Arms entire for reconsideration of this name submission.

The Caidan College of Heralds supports this appeal.

Approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Heatherwyne, Shire of

Jeanne Marie Lacroix - Administrative Device Change.

The name was registered 11/98. The submitter wishes to make Party of six vert and Or, which was registered as a badge 02/03, her device. She wishes to retain Argent, a unicorn's head couped sable, which was registered 11/98, as a badge.

Approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Lyondemere, Barony of

Éowyn Amberdrake - New Change of Augmentation:

Azure, in pale three dragons passant Or and for augmentation, in canton a cross of Caid argent

This name was "registered at some point". Her device, Azure, in pale three dragons passant Or was registered 10/83. Her current augmentation, Azure, in pale three dragons passant Or and for augmentation, on a canton azure four crescents conjoined in saltire horns outward within a bordure embattled argent, was registered 02/03. She wishes to release her current augmentation when this one is registered.

The College (and Crescent) was of mixed opinion as to whether this should be forwarded as a cross of Caid (as submitted) or as four crescent conjoined in saltire horns outward (as Laurel as consistently reblazoned it). Given the number of people who would like to see this charge registered as a cross of Caid, Crescent has elected to put forth both sides of the argument so that the College of Arms can debate the issue - and so that Wreath may reconsider whether to continue reblazoning this charge as four crescent conjoined in saltire horns outward.

In accepting an augmentation for Caitríona ní Bhriain (07/96) Jaelle Laurel ruled

To quote Baldwin in his April 1986 LoAR "Spring is in the air, and the fit is upon me - let me name but one Cross before I die!" While it is indeed quite tempting to call the four crescents conjoined in saltire a "Cross of Caid", we feel that named SCA motifs make reconstruction of blazons more difficult for heralds and scribes.

For reference, the entire Baldwin ruling (dealing with a cross of Canterbury), states:

DISCUSSION: These could also be blazoned as crosses "patty peetent globical quadrate", and I very nearly did so; but at the last minute, the poet in me rebelled. Spring is in the air, and the fit is upon me let me name but one Cross before I die!

On a more serious note, blazoning by parts is poor practice, as is coining new names for charges. Both rob the blazon of clarity. Given sufficient time and references ("globical" is likely to be new to many heralds; I know it was to me), an experienced herald or scribe could doubtless reconstruct the shape of a "cross patty potent globical quadrate" from its description, but the blazon would never sound right when read out loud, and blazons are suppose to be euphonious. (I'd suggest a patter song, but it's been done.) My alternatives were to return the submission, on the grounds that the cross was not heraldic, and could not readily be made so; or to approve it as a "cross of Canterbury". I dislike naming charges, but after weighing the options both objectively and subjectively, I concluded that, it I were to make any exceptions, this would qualify.

The cross of Caid is not an obscure charge, in fact, if a herald or scribe was unfamiliar with the charge it is much easier to find an emblazon or description of it than many of the period charges we routinely register. Four crescents conjoined in saltire horns outward has been used by Caid for over 20 years. The earliest registration was Caid's war banner in 1979. Naming a cross for the person or territory that bears is was a common period practice; the cross became known by its association. The charge is known almost exclusively within the kingdom as a cross of Caid or a Caidan cross. This usage has spread throughout the Known World in the last 20 years. Given the widespread computer access now enjoyed, not to mention the emigration of Caidans, determining what a cross of Caid is, assuming that the herald or scribe doesn't already know, should be relatively easy.

As Dolphin pointed out, there are a couple of major differences between a cross of Caid and a cross of Canterbury. First, a cross of Caid is easily reconstructed from the blazon four crescents conjoined in saltire horns outward, while reconstructing a cross of Cantebury from a cross patty potent globical quadrate is more difficult as it involves several terms that may not be familiar to the herald/scribe. Second, no matter how it is blazoned, a cross of Canterbury is a single charge while a cross of Caid is actually made up of four charges. If a cross of Caid is so blazoned, would it continue to be considered a group of four charges, or a single, cross like charge (or both)? This confusion may be sufficient reason not to blazon the crescents as a cross of Caid.

Augmentation change approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Siobhán na bhFeadh - New Name and New Device:

Per chevron sable mullety argent and azure, a crescent Or and a winged woman statant argent

The submitter is interested in a feminine name authentic for 12-14th c. Irish, though she didn't check the box to make her name authentic. She will accept minor but not major changes and if the name must be changed she cares most about the sound ("Shivan Na Vay"). The name elements are all documented from "Index of Names in Irish Annals" by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/).

Siobhán is a feminine given name. It is listed as the Early Modern Irish Gaelic (c1200-c1700) nominative form of the name. The index indicates 18 women were found in the annals with this name. The dated examples range from 1310 to 1600.

na bhFeadh is a descriptive byname meaning "[f] the Faes". The index indicates one person was found in the annals with this name. The dated examples are from 1316 (na Fed and na fed) and 1321 (na Fed).

The submitter has been informed that if anyone else draws this device they will not necessarily place one of the stars between the horns of the crescent.

Name and device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


Tighearnán Cearrbhach Ó Faoláin - New Name and New Device:

Per chevron sable and azure, on a chevron between three mullets argent two arrows inverted gules barbed and fletched sable

The submitter is interested in a masculine name authentic for 12-14th C. Irish, though he didn't check the box to make his name authentic. He will accept minor but not major changes and if the name must be changed he cares most about the sound. The name elements are all documented from "Index of Names in Irish Annals" by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/).

Tighearnán is a masculine given name. It is listed as the Early Modern Irish Gaelic (c1200-c1700) nominative form of the name. Tighernán is dated to 1201.

Cearrbhach is a descriptive byname meaning "[the] Gamester/Gambler". It is listed as the Early Modern Irish Gaelic (c1200-c1700) nominative form of the name. Conchobar Cerrbach h. Cellaig is dated to 1343.

Faolán is a masculine given name. Faoláin is the Early Modern Irish Gaelic (c1200-c1700) genitive form of the name. The index indicates 18 men were found in the annals with this name. The dated examples range from 628 to 1203. Ó Faoláin is a descendant of Faolán.

Submitted as O'Faoláin we have changed the particle to place the name completely in Gaelic, Ó Faoláin.

Name and device approved and forwarded to Laurel.


William de Hyrst - New Name.

The submitter is interested in a masculine name authentic for 12-14th century. He will accept all changes and if the name must be changed he cares most about the language/culture (presumably English).

No copies of the documentation (from a website, www.Last-names.net) were provided and we were unable to find the cited pages. It appears that he found de Hyrst from the "Lay Subsidy rolls AD 1346 and AD 1358 for County of Woecestor".

William is found in Withycombe (sn William, pp. 293-294), where it states "was introduced into England by the Normans in the 11th C, from which time it has held its place as one of the commonest men's names (from the 16th to 19th C, for instance, it averages 20 per cent. of baptismal names in oarish registers)...".

R&W (s.n. Herst, p. 229) list Thomas de Herst 1066 and Helias de Hirst 1177 among others. They note "The variant forms are due to different developments in ME of OE y which, in general, became e in the south-east, especially Essex and Kent, i in the north and the east midlands and u in the west and central midlands and the southern counties. Given this, de Hyrst seems to be a reasonable variant.

Unfortunately, this conflicts with William Randolph Hearst as one of his use names was William Hearst.

Name returned for conflict.


Wintermist, Shire of

Thórbjörn Úlfsson - New Name Change from Thórbjörn Assa.

His current name, Thórbjörn Assa, was registered 01/92. He is interested in a masculine name. He will accept minor but not major changes and if the name must be changed he cares most about the meaning ("son of wolf"). His previous name is to be released on registration of this one.

Thórbjörn is currently registered to him and he wishes to retain it as his given name.

Úlf meaning wolf is on p. 15 of Geirr Bassi as a masculine given name. The patronymic is formed as shown on p. 17 (Úlfr - remove the r, add ss to form Úlfsson).

We believe this is clear of Thorbjorn Olafsson. We note that two other "Olafsson/Ulfsson" names have been registered. The first, Thorkell Ulfsson, was registed in 01/96 via Atlantia. The second, Thorkell Óláfsson, was registered without comment 10/96 via Trimaris.

Name approved and forwarded to Laurel.


OP Notes

Donn na Gall Ui Neill is currently listed in the OP as Donegal ui Neil.


Bibliography

Bahlow, Hans. Dictionary of German Names. translated by Edda Gentry, University of Wisconsin, Madison: Max Kade Institute for German-American Studies, 1967, English version: 1993.

Black, George F. The Surnames of Scotland: Their Origin, Meaning, and History. New York: The New York Public Library, 1946. Ninth printing, 1989.

Dennys, Rodeny. The Heraldic Imagination. Cox and Wyman Ltd., Falkenham, Norfolk, 1975.

De Felice, Emilio. Dizionario dei Cognomi Italiani. 4th ed. Arnoldo Mondadori Editore. Milan, 1986.

De Felice, Emilio. Dizionario dei Nomi Italiani. 4th ed. Arnoldo Mondadori Editore. Milan, 1986.

Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name. Olney, MD: Studia Marklandica, 1977.

MacLysaght, Edward. The Surnames of Ireland. 6th ed. Dublin: Irish Academic Press, 1985.

Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "English Sign Names", http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/inn/

Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals", http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Gall.shtml

Mills, A. D. A Dictionary of English Place Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991.

Ó Corráin, Donnchadh, and Maguire, Fidelma. Irish Names. Dublin: The Lilliput Press, 1990.

Paul Wickenden of Thanet, "A Dictionary of Period Russian Names, 3rd Ed" http://www.sca.org/heraldry/paul/

Reaney, P. H., and Wilson, R. M. A Dictionary of English Surnames Oxford: Oxford Uni. Press, 3rd ed. 1995.

Stampnitzky, Julie "Surnames in Durham and Northumberland, 1521-1613", http://yucs.org/~jules/names/parish/surnames_a.html

Traupman, John C. The New College Latin & English Dictionary, Bantam, New York, 1995.

Withycombe, E. G. The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names. Oxford: Oxford Uni. Press 3rd ed. 1977.


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