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Minutes of the May 1996 Meeting

[Note: These submissions appear on the Oct 1996 LoAR]

Notes and Announcements

The May meeting of the Caidan College of Heralds took place on May 5th. In attendance were: Madawc Seamus Caradawg, Manus le Dragonier, Albyn Buckthorne, Catrin ferch Daffyd, Christopher Leyland d'Eyncourt, Griffin Crosthwait, Caointigern nic Thiobraide, Wilhelm Roderick FitzLovel, Tonwen ferch Gruffyd Aur, Morgan O'Daire, Darrag, Kelan McBride, Ghislaine d'Auxerre, Megan, Marie Elaine de Womwell, Gwendolyn Dylwen Llwelyn, Miguel Esteban Franco de los Rios, Nicolette Caramelle Avelaine, Seosaidh MacFaoilchiere, and Bronwen ferch Dafydd.

We haven't gotten the LoAR for this month yet.

Disposition of items pended from last month was announced (details in the appropriate minutes).

We have until Coronation for classes in the Fall Collegium. We need at least 7 classes.

Reminder: Coronation business must be to Crescent in writing (e-mail counts) at least a week before.

Some additional notes from Coronation (being printed here for your information, but announced at Coronation or the June meeting):

Pages are taken in to the Royal Household with the following ceremony:

It has been the custom of old for noble children to be fostered into other noble households so that their learning would be expanded and their demeanor refined as they grew into adulthood. It is in this same fashion that Their Majesties encourage and invite young nobles to participate in Their life and the household of the Royal Court. Now therefore do Their Majesties call forth as Royal Page(s): names.

As Their Majesties intend to take additional pages during Their reign, court heralds may wish to have this ceremony available.

Their Majesties should only be approached armed if you are in personal fealty to Them.

An administrative note regarding the Minutes (and Caid Letters of Intent): sources in the CoH library are normally cited in APA style and listed in the References section of the Minutes. Other sources (provided by the submitter or by heralds in attendance at the meeting) are given with bibliographic information in the text. A few items are present consistently enough that they are treated as though they are part of the College's library; these are noted with the owner's name in the Reference section.


Caid, Kingdom of

Kingdom of Caid, for the Brewers Guild (Resub Caid badge)

Per bend Or and purpure, two bunches of grapes conjoined at the stem purpure leaved vert and a goutte descending into a goblet Or.

Name:
The Kingdom's name has been previously registered by Laurel (April 1973?). The "Brewers Guild" is generic and does not appear to require separate registration, or indeed to be separately registerable.
Badge:
The previous identical submission of July 1995 was returned for lack of a petition from members of the guild. The current submission corrects this. We have blazoned the goutte as 'descending' to emphasize that the goutte does not have same visual significance as the goblet. The specific position of the grapes caused discussion as to whether it was 1) blazonable or 2) a matter of artistic interpretation. As drawn one bunch of grapes is (more-or-less) fesswise and the other is palewise, and thus are not identical. We have blazoned the bunches as conjoined to emphasize this fact, although I incline to the belief that the exact positioning is artistic detail.

BADGE APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL


al-Sahid, Shire of

Albyn Buckthorne (New personal badge)

Or, a pale gules.

Name:
The submitter's name was registered by Laurel in May of 94.
Badge:
In June 94, Laurel returned Sable, a bend argent, overall a key, ward to sinister, within a laurel wreath Or, noting that "The device also appears to conflict with Sable, a bend argent. All charges are effectively a single group, worth only one CD for their addition" (6/94). Therefore, this badge conflicts with the badge of Adrienne Morgaine de Beaumont (SCA 5/89), Or, a pale gules overall a cat's paw print purpure.

BADGE RETURNED FOR CONFLICT.


Angels, Barony of

Eric von Drachenholt (Resub Caid device)

Per chevron argent and sable, in chief two dragons coward addorsed gules, in base a tower argent masoned sable.

Name:
The submitter's name was approved and sent on to Laurel on the 4/96 Caid LoI.
Device:
His previous submission was returned by Caid for conflict; this is a significant redesign. The dragons are rampant addorsed; we are taking advantage of the default rampant posture in the blazon. There is some indication that the submitter intended the dragon to be armed sable, but the relevant arms (pun intended) are too small for this to be noticable, so we have not blazoned the detail. The submitter is, of course, free to draw the claws sable if he so desires. This comment applies to all three of his submissions.

DEVICE APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL.

Eric von Drachenholt (Resub Caid badge)

Sable, on a tower argent masoned sable within a bordure argent a dragon coward gules.

Name:
The submitter's name was approved and sent on to Laurel on the 4/96 Caid LoI.
Badge:
Again, this is a significant redesign of a previous submission returned by Caid, and the dragon is in its default posture (rampant).

PERSONAL BADGE APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL.

Eric von Drachenholt -- for House Drachenholt (New household name, Resub Caid household badge)

Argent, a dragon coward gules within an orle sable.

Name:

The submitter's name was approved and sent on to Laurel on the 4/96 Caid LoI

"Drachen" is found in Deutsche Namenkunde on pg. 335 under the heading of "Drache(e)". "Drache" itself is also found in [Bahlow, 1972], under the heading Draa(c)k, dated to 1357. Supporting the use of "Drachen-" as a prefix in toponyms, [Bahlow, 1965, pg. 87] notes "Drackenstedt" and [Seltzer, 1952] notes "Drachenfels" (incidentially asserted to be the site of Sigfried's fight with the dragon in folklore), with its fortress "Drachenburg"; and the town of "Drachten" in Friesland. "-holt" as a suffix is found in examples given by [Bahlow, 1972, pg. 246] under the heading of "Holt". This, along with the submitter's documentation, Deutsche Namenkunde on pg. 257 under the heading of "Holz", would seem to support the use of this name as a toponymic. We feel that this name is clear of "House Drachenstern" (SCA 1/82), as the last syllable is significantly changed. If the submitter's surname is changed in the registration process, we request that the household name be changed to match.

Badge:
As with the submitter's other armory at this meeting, this is a redesign of a previous submission returned by Caid for conflict, and the dragon is rampant.

HOUSEHOLD NAME AND BADGE APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL.


Calafia, Barony of

Abigail of Lough Derravara (New name, New device)

Sable, a pale azure fimbriated argent.

Name:
"Abigail" "came into use in England in the 16th C," according to [Withycombe, 1977, pg. 1] under this spelling. Lough Derravara means 'lake of the oaks' according to Book of Irish Names: First, Family & Place Names by Ronan Coghlan, Ida Grehan and P.W.Joyce. It is also found under Derravaragh, Lough, a lake in Ireland, as noted under this spelling on [Seltzer, 1952, pg. 505], and [Room, 1988, p. 45]. As constructed, the name is English, drawing a toponym from Ireland; we have left the lake's name as we found it in the Gazetteer. It is not clear to us if it would necessarily translate into English.
Device:
As drawn, the fimbriation is rather wide, and we shall warn the submitter of this. However, this conflicts with Sable, a pale argent (Tycho Brahe, protected 9505), as there is only a CD for the change in tincture of the primary charge, but not a significant difference in the primary.

NAME APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL.
DEVICE RETURNED FOR CONFLICT.

Caíntigern Ainsley (New name (change))

Name:
Her previous name, Gwenhwyvar Ainsley was registered by Laurel in May 1994. "Caíntigern" is the name of the wife of a king of Ulster (c. 626) cited under this spelling on [Ó Corrain and Maguire, 1981, pg. 43]. She wishes to retain Ainsley, her previously registered surname, which she appears to have believed was Scots Gaelic, but which Laurel appears to have registered as an English locative surname. This, of course, raises the issue of combinations between English and Gaelic, since "Caíntigern" is the first listed, and therefore older, Irish form of the given name. Since her desired surname is in fact already registered to her, we would prefer to see the combination given the benefit of the grandfather clause.

NAME APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL.

Jeanne Marie la Verriére (New name, New device)

Gules, a tricorporate lion argent.

Name:
"Jeanne" is cited as the "Modern French" form of "Jean" on [Withycombe, 1977, pg.174]. Dauzat lists "Jeanne" as the feminine form of "Jean" on [Dauzat, 1987, pg. 343, heading Jean+], states "(n.d'une des saintes femmes de l'Evangile", and " n. de bapt., et matronyme (en Calvados, anc. n. d'enfant naturel)" without date. [Neilson, 1951] provides additional support: on page 775, two queens of France are listed under the heading "Jeanne de Bourgogne", both in our period; and under the entry for "Joan of Arc" the editor spells the French form as "Jeanne d'Arc", "Marie" is cited without date as the French form of "Mary" in [Withycombe, 1977, pg. 211-2], and is found in [Dauzat, 1987, p. 416] where it is noted as being very common (although, as is usual for Dauzat, without dates). [Morlet, 1968], under her entry for "Maria" in Volume II, uses this spelling in discussion, and refers to the saint Marie- Madeleine as being honored since the 6th Cenury. The submitter originally asked for "Jeanne-Marie" (please note the hyphen), but we could not document the hyphenated combination. We have dropped the hyphen. "Verriére" is noted as "proprem. verrerie ou vitrerie, n. de localit{e'} trés rèpandu" under "Verrier", which itself means a worker in glass [Dauzat, 1987, pg. 592]. The submitter derives "Verriére" from "le Verrier" (meaning 'worker in glass,' which is presumably her intended meaning) dating to 1185 (as "le Verrier") from [Reaney, 1976, pg. 363].
Device:
In conflict with Tierced in point azure, vert and sable, a tricorporate lion argent (SCA-Roger Fitzlyon, Aug. 1979) with one CD for changes to the field. We note also note that the device conflicts with Gu. three lions ramp. all meeting under one head in the fess point guard.arg. armed and langued az. (Papworth pg. 163- Edmond Plantagenet, Earl of Lancaster), which does not, however, appear to be currently protected. This latter conflict would not be cleared by changing the tincture of the lion(s). (We are not separately considering a Letter of Intent to Protect the last mentioned arms, as they are already de facto protected by the cited conflict).

NAME APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL;
DEVICE RETURNED FOR CONFLICT

Kendra Lagerfeld (Resub Caid name (change))

Name:
The submitter's original name, "Kendrick Lagerfeld" was registered by Laurel in 5/88. This name, "Kendra Lagerfeld", was originally returned at the Caid 2/96 meeting for having no documentation. The submitter provided no new documentation, and we are (still) unable to find any documentation to support the name of "Kendra", although we are aware of its modern use as a feminine given name, and multiple registrations of it.

NAME RETURNED FOR LACK OF DOCUMENTATION

Tevin of Winchester (New name)

Name:

The submitter provides the following discussion by Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn (apparently via e-mail commentary?):

(Les Noms de Personne [by Morlet].... v.I p.70) notes a masculine name in use in 10- 12th century France (probably also later) [Thiodoinus?] that appears in the following spellings (among others): Tevynus (952), Tetvinus (850), Teuvinnus (904). In this context, the spelling "Tevin(us)" would be fairly plausible. This is a compound name, originally from the elements "theod+win(us)". (The "-us" on the end is simply a Latin grammatical ending that has been pasted on.) The same source shows feminine names ending in a feminine version of the same element "-wina". And finally, the same source also shows names in which these Latinate inflectional endings are optional (e.g., on the page mentioned above "Theotolfus" (9th c.), "Theotolf" (no explicit date)). So to sum it all up: there is sufficient evidence to hypothesize "Tevin" as a possible 9-11th century French woman's name.

We see no reason to disagree. "Winchester" is noted as "under Saxon name "Winteceaster", it became the capital of Wessex (519)," under this spelling on [Seltzer, 1952, pg. 2095]. Page 362 of A Dictionary of English Place-Names by A.D. Mills under this spelling dates "Wincestre" to 1086 (Domesday Book). We cannot definitly establish this spelling of Winchester any earlier than 1680 (from [Oxford University, 1971]), but while this is not contemporaneous with the given name, it is the current spelling..

NAME APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL.


Sayf al-Tanweer, Canton of (Calafia)

Tanweeristan, Incipient Canton of (Resub Laurel name/Resub Caid device)

Sable, an open scroll doweled argent within a laurel wreath and in chief a scimitar fesswise Or.

Name:
The group name was returned by Laurel in 2/94 for poor construction of an Arabic place name. Based on the discussion in [Seltzer, 1952], the "-stan" suffix appears to be used to form the place name indicating the habitation of a specific tribe (i.e. Afganistan from the Afgans (see the discussion under the entry for Afganistan on "op. cit." pg. 15-16, for example). The closest name we can find to "Tanweer" is found in [Hamid, 1985, pg. 45] as "Tanwir" ("enlightening") as a male given name. Due to lack of documentation in our own library we are sending this on up to the College for assistance with Arabic naming practices. The members of the Canton are very attached to using Tanweer- something or something-Tanweer.
Device:
The device was returned Caid 10/91 for lack of a name and apparently not resubmitted with the name submission considered by Laurel. A petition of support including both the proposed name and blazon are included.

NAME AND DEVICE APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL


Saint Artemas, College of (Calafia)

Andreu Brus (New name, New device)

Per chevron sable and Or, three crosses bottony fitchy counterchanged.

Name:
Submitted as "Andru Bruce". "Andreu" is found in [Withycombe, 1977, pg. 23] under the heading of "Andrew". It is found in the Hundred Rolls dated to 1273. We were unable to document the submitter's spelling, and have substituted the closest period form we are aware of. "Bruce" is found in [Black, 1946, pp. 108- 109] under this heading, with the earliest use of this spelling dated to 1668. Being unable to document the submitter's desired spelling to period (somewhat to my surprise), we are changing the spelling to "Brus" found on "ibid." page 109 dated to 1143. The submitter would prefer the original spelling but allows changes.
Device:
We note Ashord Tucken (SCA 12/84), Sable, three patriarchal crosses bottony in bend Or and count a CD for the field and one CD for the arrangement of the crosses (since the arrangement in bend is neither forced nor the default, we consider it different than the default arrangement present in Andreu's device).

NAME AND DEVICE APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL

Marcus Scirloc (Resub Caid name)

Name:
The submitter's original name submission was returned at the Caid meeting (8/93) for lack of a given name. The submitter originally wanted "Marcas". It is found in [Hanks and Hodges, 1990, pg. 226] cited as a Gaelic cognate of Mark. Unfortunately, this source has been specifically found to be unreliable by the College of Arms, and we cannot document this spelling anywhere else. Therefore we are changing the name to "Marcus" which is found on pg. 206 of [Withycombe, 1977] (among other places) under the heading "Marcus" dated to 1273. "Scirloc" is found in [Reaney, 1976, pg. 317] under the heading of "Sherlock". It is dated to 1002 as the name of "Aelfwerd Scirloc".

NAME APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL


Darach, Shire of

Dermot MacClery (Resub Caid name)

Name:
His previous submission of Jan. 1995, "Clovis of Shadow Glen", was returned for lack of documentation. "Dermot" is the earliest Anglicized form of "Diarmait" which we can document (which the authors list as "more recently", found under the latter spelling on [Ó Corrain and Maguire, 1981, pg. 73-4]. "MacClery" is a form of "M'Cleary", which was the name of a witness in 1475 as cited under "Macchlery" on [Black, 1946, pg. 468] (the entry "Macclery" simply cross- references the above cited entry). According to the submitting herald, the submitter would rather have an Anglicized version of this name as opposed to a Gaelic form.

NAME APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL.


Dreiburgen, Barony of

Eiríkr inn Litli (Resub Caid name, Resub Caid device)

Or, a chevron between two griffins combattant and a double-bladed axe gules.

Name:
His previous submission, "Eric Delaque" in Feb 1996, was returned for "further consultation." This is a major change. "Eiríkr" is found on [Haraldsson, 1977, pg. 9]. The submitter had omitted the accent above the second 'i' which we have corrected. "inn Litli" is found on [Haraldsson, 1977, pg. 25], meaning "small, short." The patronymic, while normally found in a complete ON name (at least for free men), is not required by our registration system. DEVICE: His previous submission, Lozengy Or and gules, a chevron between two griffins combattant and a double-headed axe sable in Feb. 1996, was returned for redraw (the sable griffins were not easily distinguished from the large gules lozenges, or the lozengy field should have been drawn with smaller lozenges). The current submission is a redesign.

NAME AND DEVICE APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL

Jean le Vantard (Resub Caid name, Resub Caid device)

Gules, semy of Crosses of Cleves argent, on a bend argent three dragons sable.

Name:
His previous submission of Oct. 1994, "Jacques d'Artagnan", was returned for lack of documentation. We consider this sufficiently phonetically different from "John van der Velde"(SCA, Nov. 1991). "Jean" is "among the commonest names" in France (as with other countries) under "John" on [Withycombe, 1977, pg. 178-9]. [Dauzat, 1987] confirms this (under the primary entry "Jean+"). "Vantard" is the masculine form of the French word for "boaster, braggart," as found under this spelling on [Douglas et al., 1968, pg. 323].
Device:
The dragons appear to be in their default posture (i.e. rampant bendwise). We suggest, however, if the submitter elects to retain this design element, that the dragons be shown more clearly bendwise (the default for charges on a bend) or palewise if that is his intention. His previous submission of Oct. 1994 (which is identical to the current submission) was returned for lack of name. This is in conflict with Gules, a bend between six crosses crosslet fitchy argent, for augmentation on the bend in chief an escutcheon Or charged with a demi-lion, its mouth pierced by an arrow within a double-treassure fleury-counter fleury gules, and with the unaugmented form of the same arms (Howard, Duke of Norfolk, Earl Marshal of England, protected 9412), for X.4.f.: "Number Changes...Six and higher numbers, including semy of charges, are not significantly different from each other." We do not consider the Cross of Cleves to be sufficiently different from a cross crosslet (fitchy) to generate a CD. Therefore, there is only one CD for changes to the charges on the bend (tertiaries). See, in particular, the discussion under X.4j.ii.

NAME APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL.
DEVICE RETURNED FOR CONFLICT.

Magnus Hrafnhauss (Resub name Caid)

Name:
The submitter's previous name submission, "Magnus Bloodgrim", was returned at the Caid 1/96 meeting for poor grammar. "Magn{u'}s" is found on pg. 13 of [Haraldsson, 1977], and the form without the accent is found in [Withycombe, 1977, pg. 203]. "Hrafnhauss" is found on pg. 23 of Geirr Bassi, cited as meaning "raven-skull". We note for the submitter's edification that "Magnus" -- well attested as a period given name -- in fact comes from the Latin adjective meaning "great" (since he notes that it is without meaning).

NAME APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL.


Dragon's Citadel, Canton of (Dreiburgen)

Antoinette Josephe la Rouge d'Avignon (Resub Caid device)

Azure, a pegasus rampant argent and on a bordure Or three roses gules barbed vert.

Name:
Approved by the Caidan College of Heralds in Nov. 1995
Device:
We note that the roses are not proper as they are seeded gules.

DEVICE APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL.

Dragon's Citadel, Canton of (Resub Laurel/name assistance)

Name:
The name "Canton of the Dragon's Citadel" was returned by Laurel in Jan. 96 for inability to document the overall form of the name. In particular, Laurel raised concerns with the association of "Dragon" with man-made features in English, and the very late origin of "Citadel". He suggested, among other things, an article in the Trimaran Proceedings. In March, after examining the article Laurel recommended, the group submitted "Canton of Drachantorr", which appeared to be acceptable from a documentation standpoint, but conflicted with the already registered "Shire of Drachentor". A number of alternatives were discussed, principally that the canton could add an adjective to distinguish it from "Dragon Herald" or from "Drachentorr", or using a natural feature instead of using a tower or such. Crescent notes that their strategy of asking the College for assistance before settling on a new submission is a wise one; while we cannot, unfortunately, guarantee success, the College welcomes the chance to assist in the construction of a reasonable name. This is particularly true for groups, which, due to their visibility and (hopefully) permanence should attempt to set a good example in both their names and armory.

NONE REQUESTED.

M{a'}ire nic Siobh{a'}n (New name)

Name:
"M{a'}ire" is found under this spelling on [Ó Corrain and Maguire, 1981, pg. 133], who note that it was exremely rare -- although found -- before the 17th Century. The submitter originally wished "M{'a}iri", but we could not document this spelling except in her supplied documentation. Unfortunately, her documentation -- Scottish Lore and Folklore compiled by Ronald MacDonald Douglas -- does not appear to be concerned with period names, and merely lists the (apparently modern) Scots equivalent for a variety of names, including "M{'a}iri" for "Mary". The connecting particle "nic" is the compressed form of "nighean mhic" meaning 'daughter of the son of.' "Siobh{a'}n" is a late form of "Sib{a'}n", as found under the latter spelling on [Ó Corrain and Maguire, 1981, pg. 165]. Originally the submitter wished "Sèana", but after telephonic consultation with the submitter by the submitting herald, she allowed the above name change. To support her original name, the submitter cited pages 172-3 of Scottish Lore and Folklore that "Sèana" is the Gaelic form of "Jane", but as with "M{'a}iri", we were unable to confirm this. We cannot document the use of a matronymic as opposed to a patronymic in Gaelic, but note that other languages do show this pattern (though not commonly); and the grammatical construction appears reasonable ("daughter of the son of Jane"). Absent better understanding on our part, we are forwarding this for commentary by the College. We believe it phonetically clear of "Maire O'Shannon" (SCA, Sept. 1993). The submitter apparently intends the name to be Scottish, rather than Irish.

NAME APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL.


Gyldenholt, Barony of

Michel L'Eveque (New name, New device)

Azure, on a goblet Or a latin cross- crosslet sable, in chief three lozenges argent.

Name:
Various spellings of the given name are found in a number of places -- "Michel" is found on page. 382 in [Ledèsert and Ledèsert, 1967] using the reference of "La Saint-Michel" (the Saint Michael); pg. 218 of [Withycombe, 1977] under the heading of "Michael" cites it as the name of one of the archangels (Saint Michael) with no date given; on pg 433 of [Dauzat, 1987] it is cited with the spelling as a (very common) given name derived from Saint Michael, as usual no date given. [Morlet, 1968] on pg. 79 under the heading "Michael" shows this form and indicates that the name was rarely found in documents until the 14th century (but is well represented in topographic names). "Ev{e^}que" is found in [Dauzat, 1987, pg. 242] under this heading. It is cited as a rare patronym, but frequently used with the article (ie: Lèv{e^}que), but no date is given. The meaning of this word is literally "the bishop"; this creates a potential issue with presumption; given evidence that it is actually used as a surname (although of unknown age) we are forwarding it for consideration of whether this use falls under the same exception as "Regina".
Device:
There may be an issue with presumption related to the combination of the submitter's intended surname and the use of a cross on his device. Given the widespread use of crosses in armory, however, we do not feel that the combination is unduly presumptious if the name itself is not.

NAME AND DEVICE APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL

Eleanor de Passavant (New name)

Name:
"Eleanor" is found in [Withycombe, 1977, pg. 96- 97] with this spelling one of the three common spellings from the 12th to 15th Centuries, with Eleanor of Acquitaine apparently introducing it in English. "Passavant- la-Rochere" is found in the [Seltzer, 1952, pg. 1436] as the name of a village in eastern France famous for its tileworks and brewery. The word "passavant" is found in [Douglas et al., 1968, pg. 237] cited as meaning "pass, permit" or "gangway"; I infer it is from the latter that the place name was formed.

NAME APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL


Naevehjem, Barony of

Gregory of Saint Albans (Resub Laurel device)

Per fess Or and azure, a Celtic cross counterchanged

Name:
Registered by Laurel, Jan. 1996
Device:
His previous submission, Per bend Or and azure, a Celtic cross counterchanged, was returned by Laurel in Jan. 1996 for a visual conflict with Ingold of the Flaming Gryphon, Per pale azure and Or, a Celtic crosscounterchanged. Laurel further commented that because "less than one-half of the tincture of the cross has actually been changed...[and thus] the only apparent change has been to the field." In the LoAR of Oct. 1995, Laurel revised RfS X.4.a: "Field Difference - Significantly changing the...direction of partition lines...of the field is one clear diference. In general, if the tincture of at least half the field is changed, the field will be considered different." In this case, against Ingold, we have a change in the line of partition from per pale to per fess on both the field (X.4a) and charge (X.4d); this appears to be at least technically two CDs. We contend that the current submission answers Laurel's objection that less than half of the charge of the earlier submission was changed. We also note that, while these two devices would have been in conflict by rotation under an earlier version of the RFS, that provision is no longer in the RFS. While this submission may still be considered a visual conflict, as it is technically clear we are forwarding this for discussion; returning it would appear to add "conflict by rotation" back into the RFS by precedent after it has been dropped from the actual rules.

DEVICE APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL

Gregory of Saint Albans (Resub Laurel badge)

(Fieldless) a Celtic cross per fess Or and azure

Name:
Registered by Laurel, Jan. 1996
Badge:
His previous submission, Azure, two bars invected argent and in chief five piles in point Or, was returned by Laurel in Jan. 1996 for style (the piles were not throughout). The current submission is a complete revision. We consider this clear of (fieldless) an equal-armed Celtic cross Or (SCA, Pagan le Chaunstre, Apr. 1992), with 1 CD for fieldlessness and 1 CD for change of at least half of the tincture of the charge.

BADGE APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL


Nordwache, Barony of

Ana Azul de Anda (New name change)

Name:
The submitter's current name, "Anna of Eichenwald" was registered by Laurel (9/94). "Anna", as a variant of "Anne" seems to have been reasonably in several countries. "Ana", in that spelling, is found on [de Love, 1982, pg. 124] as a derivative of the Hebrew name "Hannah", who was the mother of the Old Testament prophet Samuel. If I follow the Spanish correctly, de Love asserts that the cult of St. Anne ("Santa Ana") was celebrated beginning in the 6th century We were unable to document "Azul" or any similar form. The submitter's documentation includes photocopies of Spanish Surnames in the Southwestern United States by Woods and Altman. This appears to be a explanation of the history of Spanish surnames (intended for English speaking persons of Hispanic descent). On pg. 49 "DE ANDA" is listed, with the comment that it is a form of the verb "andar" which neans "to walk" and comes from the Latin "ambulare". Though the submitter told her consulting herald that she would be willing to drop the element "Azul" from her name, her forms indicate that she does not allow any changes; therefore we are forced to return the submission.

NAME RETURNED FOR LACK OF DOCUMENTATION

Conall Iain MacLorin (New name)

Name:
"Conall" is found [Ó Corrain and Maguire, 1981, pg. 56], meaning ("strong as a wolf"). In addition to being the header spelling, this is given as an anglicized spelling. "Iain" is found in [Withycombe, 1977] on pg. 179 under the heading of "John" as the Gaelic spelling, with "Ian" or "Iain" "now increasingly used even in England". "MacLorin" is a constructed "patronymic" based on "Lorin Mak Gilserf" (1258 a.d.) as cited under the heading "MacLaren" in [Black, 1946, pg. 534]. At this time, there is still no evidence that a Gaelic name was ever formed with a double given name, nor that mixtures of Anglicized and Gaelic forms were found in period. To make this a registerable Gaelic name, one of the given names would need to be dropped; to make it an English (Anglicized) name, all elements would need to be Anglicized.

NAME RETURNED FOR GRAMMAR


Other

Giovanni di Fiamma (Resub [administrative] device)

Per pale sable and gules, a phoenix and in chief five mullets of six points Or

Name:
Registered Jan. 96
Device:
This device was returned for administrative reasons (lack of forms) at the same meeting his name was registered. We are providing photocopies of our file copy.

DEVICE APPROVED AND SENT TO LAUREL


Postmeeting

The Minutes of this chapter of the Caidan College of Heralds were taken by Christopher Leyland d'Eyncourt and Ghislaine d'Auxerre, and edited by the Crescent Principal Herald.

In Service to Caid

Eiríkr Mjoksiglandi Sigur{dh}arson Crescent Principal Herald


References

Bahlow, H. (1965). Deutschlands Geographische Namenwelt. Klostermann, Frankfurt am Main.

Bahlow, H. (1972). Deutsches Namenlexikon. Suhrkamp, Baden-Baden.

Black, G. F. (1946). The Surnames of Scotland: Their Origin, Meaning, and History. New York Public Library, New York, 1989 reprint edition.

Dauzat, A. (1987). Dictionnaire ètymologique des Noms de Famille et des Prènoms de France. Larousse, Paris. Reviewed and augmented by Marie- Thèrése Morlet.

de Love, F. A. (1982). Nombres Propios Espa{n }oles. Editorial Vosgos, Barcelona.

Douglas, J. H., Girard, D., and Thompson, W., editors (1968). Cassell's Compact French Dictionary. Dell, New York.

Hamid, A. (1985). The Book of Muslim Names. MELS, London.

Hanks, P. and Hodges, F. (1990). A Dictionary of First Names. Oxford University Press, Oxford. Not considered an acceptable primary reference.

Haraldsson, G. B. (1977). The Old Norse Name. Yggssalr Press, Olney, Maryland.

ibn Auda, D. (1994). Rules for Submissions of the College of Arms of the Society for Creative Anachronism. Society for Creative Anachronism, Milpitas, California. With updates as published in Laurel Letters.

Iulstan Sigewealding (Stephen R. Goldschmidt), editor (1995). An Ordinary of Arms of the Society for Creative Anachronism. Free Trumpet Press, 877 San Lucas Avenue, Mountain View, California, fifth edition. With semi- annual updates and an electronic edition.

Ledèsert, D. M. and Ledèsert, R. P. L., editors (1967). Harrap's Shorter French and English Dictionary. D. C. Heath, Boston.

Morlet, M.-T. (1968). Les noms de Personne sur le Territoire de l'Ancienne Gaule du VIe au XIIe Siécle. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris. 2 Vols.

Neilson, W. A., editor (1951). Webster's Biographical Dictionary. G. & C. Merriam Co., Springfield, Mass.

Ó Corrain, D. and Maguire, F. (1981). Gaelic Personal Names. The Academy Press, Dublin.

Oxford University, editor (1971). The Compact Edition of the Oxford English Dictionary. Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Reaney, P. H. (1976). A Dictionary of British Surnames. Routledge and Kegan Paul, London, second (R. M. Wilson) edition.

Room, A. (1988). A Dictionary of Irish Place Names. Appletree Press, Belfast.

Seltzer, L. E., editor (1952). The Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer of the World. Columbia University Press, Morningside Heights, New York.

Withycombe, E. G. (1977). The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names. Oxford University Press, Oxford, third edition. reprinted 1982.


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