Rank and Recognition

Caidan Policy on Heraldic Rank and Recognition

Personal heraldic rank in Caid will be recognized by Crescent based on a herald’s degree of competence in the three major fields of heraldry:

  • FIELD,
  • COURT and
  • BOOK.

 

There are three ranks of heraldry given in Caid

  • Macer (herald-in-training),
  • Pursuivant, A Pursuivant is someone who demonstrates basic competence in at least two fields, and is exploring knowledge of the third. Alternately, someone who demonstrates advanced competence in one field and basic competence in another.
  • Herald, A Herald is someone who demonstrates advanced competence in at least two fields, and a basic competence in the third. Alternately, someone who demonstrates Mastery of one field, advanced competence in another and is exploring knowledge of the third.

 

Below are the descriptions of competence, and the criteria for the Pursuivant and Herald ranks

Recognition of such levels of skill shall be made by Crescent, in consultation with at least two senior Heralds who have observed the candidate’s work and after a personal conversation with Crescent or his/her representative to determine whether the candidate is ready for the new rank. Letters of recommendation are welcome, and will be considered seriously.

 

Basic competence – the ability to successfully participate in the activity.

For field heraldry:

    • This is the ability to hold a field and run successive rounds from memory,
    • pronounce the fighters’ names with some degree of skill,
    • be heard from across the field, and
    • mark the list cards correctly.

 

For court heraldry:

  • This is the ability to successfully run a simple court, including an understanding of the pace and flow of a court,
  • To collect and organize court business,
  • To communicate with the titular heads of the court,
  • To maintain poise and confidence in representing the Royals (or Baron and Baroness),
  • To improvise when faced with unscheduled or unexpected changes to business smoothly and effectively, and
  • To report court business to the Keeper of the Order of Precedence in a timely fashion.

 

For book heraldry,

  • this is the ability to function as an effective member of a heraldic consultation table, including a basic understanding of armorial rules (tincture, etc.) and period style,
  • how to navigate the Rules for Submissions,
  • how to research a name with sources listed in Appendix H of the College of Arms’ Administrative Handbook, and
  • how to do basic conflict-checking. As a rule of thumb, if you’re not falling all over yourself, you’ve got basic competence in that field.

 

Advanced competence – the ability to successfully manage the activity.


For field heraldry,

  • This is the ability to work with the Lists officer to arrange for the Order of Combat,
  • To recruit and assign other field heralds, etc.

 

For court heraldry,

  • This is the ability to run a large court, such as Coronation or Grand Court at a war,
  • To understand the rules of etiquette and protocol to place multiple Royals and Tepresentatives on a dais,
  • To work with local heralds to hand off from Royal to Baronial courts, and
  • To seamlessly integrate unscheduled business into court.

 

For book heraldry,

  • this is the ability to organize and run a consultation table,
  • know how to judge the reliability of sources not listed in Appendix H of the College of Arms’ Administrative Handbook,
  • to conflict check with a high degree of accuracy, and
  • how to write an appeal, a request for reconsideration, and a request for a regional style exception.
  • Advanced competency in book heraldry does not require equal knowledge and skill with names and armory; basic competency is acceptable in one of the two areas.

 

Mastery– a vague and largely undefined level of skill that heralds know when they see it.

  • To be among the most skilled, respected and knowledgeable persons in a particular field.